Philanthropy in America: A History

Philanthropy in America A History American philanthropy today expands knowledge champions social movements defines active citizenship influences policymaking and addresses humanitarian crises How did philanthropy become such a pow

  • Title: Philanthropy in America: A History
  • Author: Olivier Zunz
  • ISBN: 9780691128368
  • Page: 405
  • Format: Hardcover
  • American philanthropy today expands knowledge, champions social movements, defines active citizenship, influences policymaking, and addresses humanitarian crises How did philanthropy become such a powerful and integral force in American society Philanthropy in America is the first book to explore in depth the twentieth century growth of this unique phenomenon Ranging frAmerican philanthropy today expands knowledge, champions social movements, defines active citizenship, influences policymaking, and addresses humanitarian crises How did philanthropy become such a powerful and integral force in American society Philanthropy in America is the first book to explore in depth the twentieth century growth of this unique phenomenon Ranging from the influential large scale foundations established by tycoons such as John D Rockefeller, Sr and the mass mobilization of small donors by the Red Cross and March of Dimes, to the recent social advocacy of individuals like Bill Gates and George Soros, respected historian Olivier Zunz chronicles the tight connections between private giving and public affairs, and shows how this union has enlarged democracy and shaped history.Zunz looks at the ways in which American philanthropy emerged not as charity work, but as an open and sometimes controversial means to foster independent investigation, problem solving, and the greater good Andrew Carnegie supported science research and higher education, catapulting these fields to a prominent position on the world stage In the 1950s, Howard Pew deliberately funded the young Billy Graham to counter liberal philanthropies, prefiguring the culture wars and increased philanthropic support for religious causes And in the 1960s, the Ford Foundation supported civil rights through education, voter registration drives, and community action programs Zunz argues that American giving allowed the country to export its ideals abroad after World War II, and he examines the federal tax policies that unified the diverse nonprofit sector.Demonstrating that America has cultivated and relied on philanthropy than any other country, Philanthropy in America examines how giving for the betterment of all became embedded in the fabric of the nation s civic democracy.

    One thought on “Philanthropy in America: A History”

    1. Although this book is insightful for the history, it fails to actively engage the reader in a good way. Each page was a challenge to read, and the way it was discussed is flat out boring. It is like I am reading thesaurus in a book format. I do not recommend at all, the only reason I read this book was for school and I hated it. Good luck if you have to read this book.

    2. "Charity had been for the needy; philanthropy was to be for mankind." (10)"On average, 3 percent of the population of a city gave to philanthropic causes in 1900, but by the 1920s, the percentage jumped to 35. By 1928, more than 100 million Americans were giving more than $2.5 billion dollars per year for philanthropic causes. Many Americans had adopted an ethic of giving." (74-5)"The nonprofit sector has come of age. The Supreme Court's decisions, first allowing churches to openly combine thei [...]

    3. Readable, informative, interesting. I came to the book a bit dismissive of the US philanthropic endeavor as a tax shelter for the rich (etc.), but Zunz adds much more to the discussion and makes a strong case for a progressivism there (in the historical sense). And I was left with a ton more questions, which is okay (notably about domestic philanthropic policy in more recent years because the book focuses on global philanthropy then, and how, when and why, exactly, did the educate/advocate (or a [...]

    4. 'Olivier Zunz’s Philanthropy in America: A History is informative. But it is also thoroughly partisan, which severely limits its usefulness.'Read the full review, "Imperialism by Philanthropy," on our website: theamericanconservative

    5. It's a well written analysis of twentieth century American philanthropy as it defines it, but it defines philanthropy in an incredibly narrow way. Overall it seems a rather conservative book, which sticks to a well trodden path rather than saying anything new.

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