Variable Stars

Variable Stars This is a story of love and astronomy music and silence secrets and truth telling of world changing discoveries and unrequited desire Moving from York in the s to Regency Bath and then to Hanove

  • Title: Variable Stars
  • Author: Christina Koning
  • ISBN: 9780956521446
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is a story of love and astronomy music and silence secrets and truth telling of world changing discoveries, and unrequited desire Moving from York in the 1780s to Regency Bath, and then to Hanover in the 1840s, it concerns the lives of three people all astronomers There is Caroline, torn between her passion for music and her passion for the stars John, deaf fromThis is a story of love and astronomy music and silence secrets and truth telling of world changing discoveries, and unrequited desire Moving from York in the 1780s to Regency Bath, and then to Hanover in the 1840s, it concerns the lives of three people all astronomers There is Caroline, torn between her passion for music and her passion for the stars John, deaf from childhood, whose extraordinary mathematical gifts afford him perspectives not available to others and Edward, friend and mentor to Caroline and to John, who must conceal his innermost feelings from them both All three find fulfilment in the heavens for the set backs and disappointments they encounter on earth All three, in time, come to know the truth about variable stars.

    One thought on “Variable Stars”

    1. “A beautifully and carefully written book, well researched and imaginative, about a fascinating woman, and the tension, even then, that existed between a woman’s emotional life and her ‘career’.” Fay Weldon“Christina Koning has written the very best sort of historical novel. She takes the little-known stories of the astronomer siblings Caroline and William Herschel and their friend Edward Pigott and fashions a poignant fiction on the mutability of human life and its reflection in the [...]

    2. I am not normally one for historical fiction; I tend to prefer my history and my fiction clearly separate. In this case, though, the historical context functions as a convincing context for the more speculative aspects of the book, and the line between what "really" happened and what *might* have happened is generally (and, I think, intentionally) clearly drawn throughout. The novel focuses on the 18th-century astronomer William Herschel's sister Caroline, who probably deserves as much credit as [...]

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