Letters, Summer 1926

Letters Summer Edited by Yevgeny Pasternak Yelena Pasternak and Konstantin M AzadovskyThe summer of was a time of trouble and uncertainty for each of the three poets whose correspondence is collected in this

  • Title: Letters, Summer 1926
  • Author: Boris Pasternak Marina Tsvetaeva Rainer Maria Rilke
  • ISBN: 9780940322714
  • Page: 458
  • Format: Paperback
  • Edited by Yevgeny Pasternak, Yelena Pasternak, and Konstantin M AzadovskyThe summer of 1926 was a time of trouble and uncertainty for each of the three poets whose correspondence is collected in this moving volume Marina Tsvetayeva was living in exile in France and struggling to get by Boris Pasternak was in Moscow, trying to come to terms with the new Bolshevik regime.Edited by Yevgeny Pasternak, Yelena Pasternak, and Konstantin M AzadovskyThe summer of 1926 was a time of trouble and uncertainty for each of the three poets whose correspondence is collected in this moving volume Marina Tsvetayeva was living in exile in France and struggling to get by Boris Pasternak was in Moscow, trying to come to terms with the new Bolshevik regime Rainer Maria Rilke, in Switzerland, was dying Though hardly known to each other, they began to correspond, exchanging a series of searching letters in which every aspect of life and work is discussed with extraordinary intensity and passion Letters Summer 1926 takes the reader into the hearts and minds of three of the twentieth century s greatest poets at a moment of maximum emotional and creative pressure.

    One thought on “Letters, Summer 1926”

    1. I am giving this chronicle of one Summer five stars all around. It especially goes to the translators who had to translate Russian, French, and German into English. There were passages in the text that were untranslated but had footnotes that were in English. And I was rather glad for the footnotes because I could tell if my own partial translations were correct.The letters in this volume were written during a turbulent time during The Soviet Era. Many poets and writers left the country because [...]

    2. After my time spent wrestling with Rilke and mostly losing, I was in Brickbat Books during a break from work the other day and saw this book of correspondence on the shelves. The New York Review of Books imprint is usually a good bet for getting your money's worth, and Pasternak is a poet I've always wanted to know more about, so I grabbed it. Having been raised in a pro-Soviet (or at least pro-Marxist) household, where the word "reactionary" is a well-recognized insult, I've always been a Mayak [...]

    3. Because I could find a link to it nowhere, and because this book blew me away in that I only stumbled upon it by searching for NYRB non-fiction at a smaller nearby college, here is Tsvetayeva's Your Death, included at the end of the letters:'Every death, even the most out of the extraordinary, I mean yours, Rainer, inevitably falls in line with other deaths, between the last prior to it and the first after.'No one has ever stood at a graveside without the thought: "Whom did I stand by last? Whom [...]

    4. What to make of these letters exchanged by three of the greatest poets of the 20th century in that glorious summer of 1926? Immediately the heart-on-the-sleeve will put a sour taste in a number of readers' mouths. The raptures will ring excessive for many, as it seems as if these poets are trying to outdo each other for beauty of expression. Tsvateava is in exile in France, cut off, sounds desperate and needy, directs the exchanges, acts as though she wants to possess the great German poet. Rilk [...]

    5. Marina Tsvetaeva was a brilliant Romantic poet who lived in the early 20th Century in the Soviet Union. Her letters to Rilke and Pasternak in the Summer of 1926 are transcendent. Rilke matches her in poetic grace. Pasternak has a harder time keeping up and, to be frank, he spends a lot of his time whining when, among the three of them, he had the least to complain about. Each of these poets was a tempestuous soul. Rilke and Tsvetaeva really did seem to speak their own second language, but all th [...]

    6. Heartbreaking and poignant, the letters between Marina Tsvetaeva, Rainer Maria Rilke and Boris Pasternak show the strength of the written word in extraordinarily difficult times; Tsvetaeva in exile in France, Pasternak squeaking by in Moscow, and Rilke slowly dying in the Swiss countryside. Their emotive and passionate letters show the evolution of their poetic ideas that would remain with Tsvetaeva and Pasternak for the entirety of their lives. Without this creative collaboration between the th [...]

    7. Conozco poco de los tres escritores, solo he leído algo de la poesía de Tsvitaieva, pero vale la pena leer este encuentro de tres poetas, bastante intensas sus cartas, y su postura frente a la vida.

    8. The letters themselves are interesting, both because of their historical importance and their ornate prose. Tsvetaeva and Rilke certainly know how to write (Pasternak, too, of course, but his letters come off more whiny than poetic). I had a major issue with the layout and editing of this collection, however. It is incredibly hard to follow major chunks of the book because it lacks the poems which the poets are describing. An updated volume of the book would be great if it had an index in the ba [...]

    9. When a writer takes my interest on unexpected journey my desire to know everything about the writer becomes a little excessive and a new journey begins not only to read all of his or her's work but anything they have written. Poetry, short stories, essays but most importantly letters. My home library has expanded through these searches to a bursting point with the heavy tomes that constitute "The Complete Letters of ." you can fill in the blank. Samuel Beckett, James Joyce et al, but this set of [...]

    10. I had just finished reading Doctor Zhivago when I happened upon this book at the library. I was curious After reading this, I see an interesting reflection of Boris Pasternak's life (as laid out in these letters from 1926 to Tsvetayeva and Rilke) in Doctor Zhivago. As I read it, I realized that Boris is Yuri and Marina (Tsvetayeva) is Lara! It gave more context and deeper meaning to a much loved novel that I read fairly often. Interesting!

    11. This is an amazing collection of letters between three poets throughout one summer. Questions and conversations about poetry, censorship, artistic influence, and dying. You know, typical light read.

    12. Perhaps it was the translation, but I didn't really enjoy this. It was on my "to read" shelf from 2010, so perhaps it is just a change in tastes. There were some really lovely moments in this work, but all and all it was a lot of wading through ego and esoterism to get to them.

    13. I've read this book twice. Three great poets--Rilke, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva--and up-close glimpses of their lives and work. A must read.

    14. Every thing I read that has Marina Tsvetaeva's hand in it lets me know how one should feel life - grab it shake it and hold on to it tight as it takes you for a wild ride

    15. " ni la epístola ni los sueños se dan por encargo: se sueña y se escribe no cuando nosotros queremos, sino cuando ellos quieren: la carta ser escrita, y el sueño ser soñado." ( m. ts)!!inmersión sin precedentes en el universo de unas de las mentes más interesantes de las letras rusas/ alemanas. reconstrucción muy completa de diferentes aspectos de la relación que hay entre los tres ( y entre cada uno), a pesar de que muchos datos son, intencionadamente, ignorados, ya que la atención es [...]

    16. Estas cartas te meten en la vida de los tres autores a un nivel muy íntimo, con sus confidencias, sus dudas y su día a día. Me llamó la atención, sobre todo, la personalidad de Marina, tan pasional, tan decidida. Un documento genial para conocer algo más de su vida y sus obras

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *