Religion and Science Fiction

Religion and Science Fiction Description Religious themes concepts imagery and terminology have featured prominently in much recent science fiction In the book you hold in your hands scholars working in a range of disciplines

  • Title: Religion and Science Fiction
  • Author: James F. McGrath
  • ISBN: 9781608998869
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • Description Religious themes, concepts, imagery, and terminology have featured prominently in much recent science fiction In the book you hold in your hands, scholars working in a range of disciplines such as theology, literature, history, music, and anthropology offer their perspectives on a variety of points at which religion and science fiction intersect From FrankDescription Religious themes, concepts, imagery, and terminology have featured prominently in much recent science fiction In the book you hold in your hands, scholars working in a range of disciplines such as theology, literature, history, music, and anthropology offer their perspectives on a variety of points at which religion and science fiction intersect From Frankenstein, by way of Christian apocalyptic, to Star Wars, Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica, and much , and from the United States to China and back again, the authors who contribute to this volume serve as guides in the exploration of religion and science fiction as a multifaceted, multidisciplinary, and multicultural phenomenon Endorsements In Religion and Science Fiction, James McGrath has gathered an impressive array of voices and approaches to the issue of science fiction s treatment of religion This richly interdisciplinary book shows there s to the study of religion in SF than just theology or literary criticism alone have to offer Gabriel Mckee author of The Gospel According to Science Fiction Religion and Science Fiction is a blessing to scholars and science fiction fans alike The ideas engaged by each author from postmodern post apocalypticism to dime store heroes and space faring robots challenge our assumptions about culture, intellectual life, and even the very essence of what it means to be human The authors use science fiction to explore religion and religion to elucidate science fiction this combination gives us a richer understanding of both Robert M Geraci author of Apocalyptic AI Visions of Heaven in Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and Virtual Reality This collection invites the reader into thoughtful reflection on the religion and theology broadly understood of a range of science fiction works broadly understood Kudos to McGrath and his contributors for this interdisciplinary exploration Marti J Steussy_MacAllister Petticrew author of Forest of the Night and Dreams of Dawn About the Contributor s James F McGrath is Associate Professor of Religion and the Clarence L Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language and Literature at Butler University in Indianapolis He is the author of John s Apologetic Christology 2001 and The Only True God 2009.

    One thought on “Religion and Science Fiction”

    1. Welllll, this was something of a disappointment. There are a few good essays, notably Eriberto Lozada's speculative but interesting exploration of how scientific thinking and SF might have been influential in China, but even here the book's recurring and besetting limitation comes into play: he just doesn't have that much to say about SF. McGrath's own centrepiece article, about twice as long as any other, explores various potential ramifications of the development of robots--or artificial life, [...]

    2. In his introduction, “Religion and Science Fiction,” editor James McGrath comments on the need for a less fragmented approach to the connections between religion and science fiction. This collection of sophisticated essays offers a widely varied survey of such potential approaches. As McGrath introduces the various essays, he mentions such important overlap between science fiction narratives and religious concerns such as cosmology in apocalyptic literature; portrayals of the future as a sta [...]

    3. Here's what I have to say:1. "Just because you use big words it doesn't mean that your assumed representations and supposed allegories are not ridiculously far-fetched."AND 2. "This is why I wasn't an English major." Gains some interesting tidbits of SciFi knowledge, but what a mire I had to drudge through to gain them.

    4. As with many books of essays, very uneven. Some were poorly-organized and from a very Christian perspective, but most were interesting and informative.

    5. Interesting read although a bit uneven. If readers are not familiar with the works mentioned it can be a little tricky to follow, but still worth the time.

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