Lawnboy

Lawnboy Fiction The adventure of seventeen year old Evan s life begins with mowing a neighbor s lawn an ordinary chore that launches him into a world of desire confusion and betrayal LAWNBOY is about the p

  • Title: Lawnboy
  • Author: Paul Lisicky
  • ISBN: 9781885983404
  • Page: 129
  • Format: Paperback
  • Fiction The adventure of seventeen year old Evan s life begins with mowing a neighbor s lawn, an ordinary chore that launches him into a world of desire, confusion, and betrayal LAWNBOY is about the possibility of finding connection in a world of broken relationships and decaying motels the urban, artificial landscape of South Florida, as lush and troubling as Evan sFiction The adventure of seventeen year old Evan s life begins with mowing a neighbor s lawn, an ordinary chore that launches him into a world of desire, confusion, and betrayal LAWNBOY is about the possibility of finding connection in a world of broken relationships and decaying motels the urban, artificial landscape of South Florida, as lush and troubling as Evan s imagination This adventure of the heart takes place in as evocative a landscape as any you ll find in fiction, its Floridian decay and lushness the perfect setting for a story dense with eroticism, disillusionment, and the surprising grace notes of renewal Bernard Cooper.

    One thought on “Lawnboy”

    1. I read this book in a matter of three days. First of all, I was intrigued by the Title when it was recommended to me. It was Recommended to those who enjoyed THE HOURS by Michael Cunningham. I had LAWNBOY sitting on my bookshelf for a few months until I finally decided to get into it when I noticed a review on the backcover by Michael Cunningham, the reknown author. He described it as a novel of mystery and great beauty. Now that I've finished reading LAWNBOY I can say that I did enjoy it and, m [...]

    2. Lawnboy Evan is still in high school when he begins the account of his life to date. He has a liking for older men so when a neighbour, William, asks him to cut his lawn he has no problem taking him up on his offer and the invitation afterwards. Soon he moves in with William, deserting his parents and throwing up an Ivy League scholarship. But he is not settled and drifts rather aimlessly while convinced he, like many he knows, has AIDS until he eventually finds fulfilment despite himself.Lawnbo [...]

    3. Adding Mark Doty's book reminded me how much I loved this one. (They are cute boyfriends who I waited on all the time in P-town.) One of the things I like about queer fag fiction that is from a time before the queer visibility that we "enjoy", is that due to the the secret nature of being queer, the opportunites the characters have to understand and experiment with identity often feel so uncomfortable that you want to judge them. But it is always important to remind yourself of a situation's con [...]

    4. Reading Challenge 2018 - Pinterest: book with a great first line. A wonderful book about the pain of growing up and not knowing what you want. Evan starts out the summer as a lawnboy, cutting a neighbors grass. This leads to him coming out to his family and leaving them to move into the neighbor's house and bed. Evan believes he is in love with William, but really does not know what he wants. The second part of the novel is him living with his brother Peter, who also left home at an early age. P [...]

    5. A beautiful, moving and compelling novel.I loved it. Not much else to say and of course I would recommend it to friends and loved ones.

    6. Is it fair to compare one writer to another? Is the comparison ever quite right? Blurbs for Lawnboy compared Paul Lisicky to Michael Cunningham (The Hours, A Home at The End of the World, etc.), and the cover even boasted a blurb from Cunningham himself. While certainly flattering, how does Lawnboy compare?Non-straight characters? Check.Coming of age/awakening type plot? Check.Complicated romance? Checkity-check-check.But couldn’t one say this about plenty of other books? Francesca Lia Block a [...]

    7. This is the beautifully written story of a lost boy. Misunderstood by his family and uncertain where he belongs in the world, he drifts from one situation to another—in constant search of love and himself. He begins by finding a father figure/lover—an older man whose heart is sealed off. Later, he wanders into the world of his estranged brother and becomes the lover of his brother’s friend. In each case, Evan’s world subconsciously revolves around manifestation of family, as if he believ [...]

    8. Start by accepting from Page 1 that the narrator is a depressed, lonely gay teenager who hooks up with a wildly narcissistic 41 year old guy and moves in with him. Except that’s not what Lawnboy is about, really. I thought that was the story, but then snap, in a page we’re up and out and moving on to a dive motel elsewhere in Florida (mostly, it turns out, the only constant in this novel are winding descriptions Floridian fauna and vegetation). Another plot shift follows, but by then my inte [...]

    9. Loved the older man/younger boy affair. Struck home, really nailed some of my experiences. Actually that reminds me of a lesson learned I have to do something aboutThe biggest success of this book is not character development or story line, but the creation of Florida and its natural/human environments as prominent and real figures. I've never been there myself but I sure feel like I have a true sense of the place: its decay, its promise, its beauty, and its oppressive weather.

    10. Before this, I had only ever read Lisicky's shorter pieces. I found this novel to be full of the lovely language and astute observations of his shorter work. There is a lot of ground he is trying to cover in this novel, a lot of pain and experience that may be limited to a gay adolescent male's experience, but can nonetheless be appreciated by any reader.

    11. A great exploration of loneliness and loss, pain and disappointment. It challenges our expectations of normality, with Evan embodying that confusion and authenticity in a heartbreaking way. A beautiful book worth reading for sure.

    12. GrittyI went back and forth with my feelings for Wyatt, at times he seems innocent and a few minutes later he's terrible. I guess everyone is like that to some degree. I could have done without the constant descriptions of the plant life. Otherwise, this was a good read.

    13. This was a good read. It treads well-worn ground but does it in a very fresh and occasionally quite insightful way. I wonder what the author went on to write after this. He produced some passages of incredibly beautiful writing.

    14. Angsty and Emo-ish. This would have been a typical coming-of-age gay novel. Except it isn't. It's far deeper than I can dig. Far better and metaphorical than I can understand. this is something I probably will reread when I'm feeling more literary.

    15. A coming-of-age story with a gay protagonist, in some ways feels unlikely, but the writing is lush, and descriptively beautiful. A fast paced book, and reads as rapidly.

    16. Took a class with Paul so this brought another dimension to my understanding of the book.Captivating coming of age story.

    17. I suspect that Mark Doty's brilliance is the main reason people go wandering hopefully towards Paul Lisicky. Turn back, peeps. Nothing to see here.

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