Madness: A Very Short Introduction

Madness A Very Short Introduction Madness is something that frightens and fascinates us all It is a word with which we are universally familiar and a condition that haunts the human imagination In this Very Short Introduction Andrew

  • Title: Madness: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Andrew Scull
  • ISBN: 9780199608034
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Paperback
  • Madness is something that frightens and fascinates us all It is a word with which we are universally familiar, and a condition that haunts the human imagination In this Very Short Introduction, Andrew Scull provides a provocative and entertaining examination of the social, cultural, medical, and artistic responses to mental disturbance across than two millennia, conMadness is something that frightens and fascinates us all It is a word with which we are universally familiar, and a condition that haunts the human imagination In this Very Short Introduction, Andrew Scull provides a provocative and entertaining examination of the social, cultural, medical, and artistic responses to mental disturbance across than two millennia, concluding with some observations on the contemporary accounts of mental illness He shows that through the centuries, in poetry and in prose, in drama and in the visual arts, madness has been on display for all to see He also describes how a whole industry has grown up, devoted to its management and suppression Perhaps most important, he conveys how madness profoundly disturbs our common sense assumptions threatens the social order, both symbolically and practically creates almost unbearable disruptions in the texture of daily living and turns our experience and our expectations upside down Throughout this fascinating history, many fascinating and arresting pictures illuminate the overall portrait of madness in its various contexts.

    One thought on “Madness: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. a concise intro into a controversial illnessThe book sheds light on madness and the controversy that surrounds it when it comes to its diagnosis (somatic disease or psychological disturbance) and treatment.

    2. I was a bit disappointed on the incredibly heavy focus on madness' history, especially the perception of the public before the 19th century, followed the era of alyssums and psychoanalysis. While they're certainly important aspects when debating mental illness, I felt the topic was beaten to death. More modern aspects of mental illness were quite sadly pushed to a short last chapter, mostly talking about the introduction of the new drugs of the 20th century.In the whole book, close to nothing wa [...]

    3. More of a sociohistorical overview than I expected, and certainly one of the more openly opinionated entries I've read in the Very Short Introduction series. Not a bad book, by any stretch, but not as good as I had hoped it would be, likely for the reasons mentioned above.

    4. Um livro para ser lido numa tarde. Debruça-se muito levemente, como o próprio título indica, sobre a história da Loucura. Indo desde a Grécia Antiga, ainda que muito poucas páginas sejam dedicas a ela, passando muito subtilmente pela Idade Média. Detém-se um pouco mais na Idade Clássica, devido ao facto de Londres ter tido uns dos mais importantes hospitais no que se refere à loucura. O tal Bethlem Royal Hospital, fazendo paralelo com um outro em França, Hôpital général. Faz uma br [...]

    5. Lo que más ha destacado para mí de este breve repaso de la historia de la locura es que, lo que realmente deberíamos temer no son a los locos, sino a los que los que se "encargan" de ellos. La tranquilizadora de B. Rush es una buena metáfora del tratamiento que han recibido los enfermos mentales, especialmente los más graves, a lo largo de los últimos cientos años: sin ningún tipo de estimulación externa y limitados físicamente lo máximo posible.

    6. This should perhaps be titled “The History of Madness – A very Short Introduction” as Andrew Scull concentrates on the treatment of the mad throughout history rather than discussing in any depth what madness is. As a History it is very informative, from an excess of black bile, to asylums, psychoanalysis, and big pharma, Scull tells to the story of how they all evolved and how their rising stars have all fallen. Never less than skeptical about any of the mechanisms for helping the mentally [...]

    7. I really enjoyed this book but I was expecting more of an overview of how madness works, both as a biological and as a psychoanalytical condition. Instead, this book is about the history of psychological treatment. I learned how afflicted people were locked up, the way methodology adapted and evolved, the slow dissolution of the insane asylum, and the chilling future of pharmaceutical interest in treatment. There's very little on what madness is or how it works. Still, the subject matter is unde [...]

    8. I consider the title of this misleading. The other "very short introduction" titles I have read so far (Quantum mechanics & magnetism) did not suffer from this. Instead of talking about madness itself the author seems to have wanted to write about the failings of Psychiatry and Psycho-pharmacology. I was looking for an examination of mental illness and instead got a heap of vitriol and scorn against two very recent features in a subject with a long history.

    9. This book is not so much about madness as it is about evolving views of madness through select eras of Western history. This was an interesting read but I do wish the author could have remained more objective at points.

    10. Very informative and the subject matter is quite enthralling, but not one of the best written in the "very short introduction" series. It's very dry.

    11. As with all the Very Short Introduction books, marvellous concise and packed summary of key themes, ideas, theories regarding 'madness'.

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