Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror

Intel Wars The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror The shock of the attacks sent the American intelligence community into hyperactive growth Five hundred billion dollars of spending in the Bush Cheney years turned the U S spy network into a monst

  • Title: Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror
  • Author: Matthew M. Aid
  • ISBN: 9781608194810
  • Page: 377
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The shock of the 9 11 attacks sent the American intelligence community into hyperactive growth Five hundred billion dollars of spending in the Bush Cheney years turned the U.S spy network into a monster 200,000 plus employees, stations in 170 countries, and an annual budget of than 75 billion Armed with cutting edge surveillance gear, high tech weapons, and fleetThe shock of the 9 11 attacks sent the American intelligence community into hyperactive growth Five hundred billion dollars of spending in the Bush Cheney years turned the U.S spy network into a monster 200,000 plus employees, stations in 170 countries, and an annual budget of than 75 billion Armed with cutting edge surveillance gear, high tech weapons, and fleets of armed and unarmed drone aircraft, America deploys the most advanced intel force in history But even after the celebrated strike against Osama Bin Laden, America s spies are still struggling to beat a host of ragtag enemies around the world In Intel Wars, preeminent secrecy and intelligence historian Matthew Aid our reigning expert on the NSA Seymour M Hersh delivers the inside stories of how and why our shadow war against extremism has floundered Spendthrift, schizophrenic policies leave next generation spy networks drowning in raw data, resource starved, and choked on paperwork Overlapping jurisdictions stall CIA operatives, who wait seventy two hours for clearance to attack fast moving Taliban IE D teams U.S military computers their classified hard drives still in place turn up for sale at Afghan bazaars Swift, tightly focused operations like the Bin Laden strike are the exception rather than the rule Intel Wars based on extensive, on the ground interviews, and revelations from Wikileaks cables and other newly declassified documents shows how our soldier spies are still fighting to catch up with the enemy Matthew Aid captures the lumbering behemoth that is the U.S military intelligence complex in one comprehensive narrative, and distills the unprecedented challenges to our security into a compelling and sobering read.

    One thought on “Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror”

    1. I wanted to like this book and it seemed extraordinarily well researched, but the final product just didn't come together particularly well. Time sensitive material like this tends to have its greatest impact if it can be published fairly quickly and it seemed like this book could have used a few more cycles of editing. There was a lot of information there and a lot of that information was interesting, but I don't feel like I have that much more of a firm grasp on the "intel wars" that took plac [...]

    2. while reading this, I bounced between the 3 and 4. it'd be 3 stars at $20, hardcover, a mere 272 page book that would leave you wondering where your andrew jackson went. at the 2.99 price point, for 272 pages, hell's bells, a professional work, a very small area of weakness about 40% in but otherwise statistical data and non-fiction writeups that are otherwise unavailable. author switches between talking about individual sizes, history, personalities so there's something for everyone. i learned [...]

    3. so far, this is horrible. all i'm seeing is selected sound bytes to justify that the war in Afghanistan is unwinnable. We should have never gone after bin laden, everything is Bush's fault. Acts of treason are ok if you don't like the rules, and apparently the military was all for increasing troop strength in AF. Umm WTF? this guys an idiot. It seems that this is a lets blame everyone else, go back to pre-9/11 dogma of technology will do everything (Drones) and make the current administration ou [...]

    4. Good book about the national intelligence architecture of the United States of America, with specific focus on its growth and development since September 11, 2001 and expansion of counter-terrorism operations. Mr. Aid chronicled the size, make up, technology enablers, policies, processes, capabilities and limitations of the Intelligence Community (IC) over the last decade.This book highlighted this challenge by analyzing the attempt to improve intelligence capabilities since 2001 via complex dig [...]

    5. Damn this book was dense.So many acronyms I had to write some down.Also name dropping like crazy, often on someone who would never be mentioned again.It does a good job giving a look into the monster that is the US intelligence community, but I feel that with such a gigantic subject, any book under 700 pages can only scratch the surface.The inclusion of information found on WikiLeaks was a point of concern though. Much of the information I found to be irresponsible to print, even if it was alrea [...]

    6. More descriptive than anything, Aid droned on about the worrisome state of the intelligence community at present before really making any analytical points or arguments until he Conclusion/Epilogue. The tone and sheer encyclopedic nature of the book failed to engage me. The title promises a more stimulating and enjoyable reading experience than Aid delivers in the book.

    7. I somehow was able to motivate myself to finish 30% of this book and I couldn't go beyond that. It's like a militRy historian took a giant dump on the pages and smothered it with his bare hands. All you get here is a lot of statistics and mathematical data that is absolutely useless. Would not recommend. Now I know what I am burning this winter for some heat outdoors.

    8. Some interesting insights and an overall interesting description of intel challenges. In between there is a lot of story telling that contains information that I do not find useful. This book could have been less than half the size

    9. Interesting examination of Intelligence assists and activities. I found the analysis and conclusions to be kinda shallow, seemed like a lot of gossip and whining dug up from all kinds of sources from social media to personal interviews. Written in 2011, many of the assertions are outdated.

    10. Realy good work. Very iinformmative. Lots of information and very thoroughly researched. Loots of perspective into the worl we face today

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