Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics

Lise Meitner A Life in Physics Lise Meitner was a pioneer of nuclear physics and co discoverer with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann of nuclear fission Braving the sexism of the scientific world she joined the prestigiou

  • Title: Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics
  • Author: Ruth Lewin Sime
  • ISBN: 9780520208605
  • Page: 232
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lise Meitner 1878 1968 was a pioneer of nuclear physics and co discoverer, with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann, of nuclear fission Braving the sexism of the scientific world, she joined the prestigious Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry and became a prominent member of the international physics community Of Jewish origin, Meitner fled Nazi Germany for Stockholm inLise Meitner 1878 1968 was a pioneer of nuclear physics and co discoverer, with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann, of nuclear fission Braving the sexism of the scientific world, she joined the prestigious Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry and became a prominent member of the international physics community Of Jewish origin, Meitner fled Nazi Germany for Stockholm in 1938 and later moved to Cambridge, England Her career was shattered when she fled Germany, and her scientific reputation was damaged when Hahn took full credit and the 1944 Nobel Prize for the work they had done together on nuclear fission Ruth Sime s absorbing book is the definitive biography of Lise Meitner, the story of a brilliant woman whose extraordinary life illustrates not only the dramatic scientific progress but also the injustice and destruction that have marked the twentieth century.

    One thought on “Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics”

    1. This is a brilliant book. I have not enjoyed a book so much for years. It is the story of one of the most outstanding women scientists of the last century. A girl in Vienna in the late 1890’s, with an interest in maths and science, whose best prospects would have been becoming a French teacher, Lise Meitner beats the odds and becomes a world calibre physicist. Sime’s masterly narrative describes the incredible difficulties she had to overcome, first to get an education and later to be accept [...]

    2. More than just a biography of scientist. Highlights aspects of the world wars, anti-semitism, and feminism in europe that are not often discussed. Loved it.

    3. Overall, a compelling and useful biography of a less-known but very important physicist. Dr. Sime is a gifted writer, too, as well as a scientist in her own right. If you're interested in physics, the history of the physical sciences, or female scientists, it's a very good book to read.

    4. Loved this one. Had a long section in the middle that was very technical and I had to skim over that but the story of her life, contribution to physics, and they people she spent time with was facinating. She was royally screwed by her friend and collegue but handled it with grace

    5. Lise Meitner, one of the key figures in the discovery of fission, would be more widely remembered in history if she had not been Austrian-Jewish and made her break through findings in exile, right before World War II. There is plenty to admire in her journey, from her pioneering entrance to university formerly out of reach to women, to leading the physics section of the KWI.This books provides a very engaging overview of her life, bringing Lise to life, along with the historical events that mark [...]

    6. Well-researched account of Meitner's life and the research that led up to the discovery of nuclear fission. It's sympathetic even in taking a stance on the political events and actions that shaped Meitner's career and later life, presenting a clear picture of her scientific achievements and tracing the reasons why they remain so little-known. Moreover an inspiring read about a woman who was one of the first in science, going on to become a brilliant pioneer in nuclear physics. The science-heavy [...]

    7. I loved the story of this woman's life presented in this book, but the description of the physics was weak. I had to turn elsewhere for that. Overall, it was a difficult read, but worth it.

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