Great Adventure: How the Mounties Conquered the West

Great Adventure How the Mounties Conquered the West In an almost impossible mission was accomplished by an improbable posse of recruits With little training and less experience men embarked upon a nine hundred mile march from civilized Toron

  • Title: Great Adventure: How the Mounties Conquered the West
  • Author: David Cruise Alison Griffiths
  • ISBN: 9780312155384
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1873, an almost impossible mission was accomplished by an improbable posse of recruits With little training and less experience, 150 men embarked upon a nine hundred mile march from civilized Toronto to a trading post at the heart of the wild frontier Their goal to penetrate Indian territory, stamp out nefarious whiskey trafficking, and bring order to a lawless land.In 1873, an almost impossible mission was accomplished by an improbable posse of recruits With little training and less experience, 150 men embarked upon a nine hundred mile march from civilized Toronto to a trading post at the heart of the wild frontier Their goal to penetrate Indian territory, stamp out nefarious whiskey trafficking, and bring order to a lawless land What they encountered was horrifying and glorious in ways they could never have imagined Official histories of the march have been largely based on the writings of the first commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and are colored accordingly David Cruise and Alison Griffiths present an entirely different perspective of this extraordinary event, using such primary sources as diaries and memoirs by the Mounties themselves, contemporary newspaper accounts, and other recently discovered materials.

    One thought on “Great Adventure: How the Mounties Conquered the West”

    1. Highly enjoyed reading this book with my wife. It especially piqued our interest when we realized that part of their journey out to Alberta took them right through our 'backyard'. Very stirring to read of the intense challenges these Mounties faced, and very intrigued to read of what the western prairies were like just 140 years ago. Very worthwhile historical piece!

    2. I was able to follow the narrative because I'm already familiar with the early history of the Mounties, but I suspect another USian reader would find the abrupt topic switches between chapters confusing. (For instance, it probably takes a pretty high level of geekery to go "yay, Jerry Potts!" as I did on that gentleman's first appearance in the narrative, instead of muttering impatiently till the last chapter over why several chapters of the book are about a half-Native man with no visible link [...]

    3. I am enjoying the contrast between different people's diaries and letters. The gov't needs 150 good men to calm the Indians on the prairie. Farm kids thought they had hit the gravy train, and opulant kids thought they were dieing.

    4. The story of the creation of the RCMP in the 1870s. Packed with restless natives, lawless whiskey runners, buffalo hunts and runaway horses, all testing the resolve (and the fabulously waxed moustachios) of a slowly deteriorating force marching 900 miles with dwindling provisions.

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