Parrot

Parrot One of the nonconformist figures in the animal kingdom the parrot is linked to humans by its ability to speak a trait many have found unsettling though this discomfort is offset by its gorgeous plum

  • Title: Parrot
  • Author: Paul Carter
  • ISBN: 9781861892379
  • Page: 244
  • Format: Paperback
  • One of the nonconformist figures in the animal kingdom, the parrot is linked to humans by its ability to speak a trait many have found unsettling, though this discomfort is offset by its gorgeous plumage, which makes it one of the most popular members of the avian family Unlike previous studies that have treated parrots as simply a curious oddity, Paul Carter offersOne of the nonconformist figures in the animal kingdom, the parrot is linked to humans by its ability to speak a trait many have found unsettling, though this discomfort is offset by its gorgeous plumage, which makes it one of the most popular members of the avian family Unlike previous studies that have treated parrots as simply a curious oddity, Paul Carter offers here in Parrot a thoughtful yet spirited consideration of the natural and cultural history of parrots, discussing parrot portraiture, the role and significance of parrots mimicry in human culture, and parrot conservation, as well the parrot s role in literature, folklore and mythology, film, and television worldwide.Parrot takes three different approaches to the squawker the first section, Parrotics, examines the historical, cultural, and scientific classification of parrots Parroternalia, the second part, looks at the association of parrots with the different languages, ages, tastes, and dreams of society and, finally, Parrotology investigates what the mimicry of parrots reveals about our own systems of communication Humorously written and wide ranging in scope, this volume takes readers beyond pirates and Polly wants a cracker to a new kind of animal history, one conscious of the critical and ironic mirror parrots hold up to human society.

    One thought on “Parrot”

    1. This is the third book in this series I've read and so far it's the worst. The book on otters discussed conservation and otter hunting in depth, but it did not rise to this level of guilt tripping. If that wasn't annoying enough, Carter approaches his subject at an academic level most people will not be able to follow, discussing things like the four ur-parrots or how parrots symbolize the collective imaginary. I just wanted to read about the history of birds! I definitely would not recommend th [...]

    2. As someone who adores parrots I felt like this was a very poorly written book. Very difficult train of thought and written more for academics then general readership. This series focuses on animals and their place in human society, culture, and folklore, though I feel like the poor organisation of this book made it very difficult to get anything out of it.

    3. "'One of the most significant mistakes people can make with their companion parrot is to allow them to run up their shoulder.' Which no doubt explains the generally unreliable behaviour of pirates.""But the cruelty we inflict when we deduct parrot from its flock leaves a scar. The ornateness of cages may sublimate the guilt we feel, as if richness of ornament can compensate for the loss of free flight amid jewel-like but living companions.""Parrots, like other birds, can form a coherent 360-degr [...]

    4. Carter's discussion and discovery of parrot goes far beyond a mere history -- it delves into parrot as a vital part of our mythology.

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