Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan

Racing the Enemy Stalin Truman and the Surrender of Japan With startling revelations Tsuyoshi Hasegawa rewrites the standard history of the end of World War II in the Pacific By fully integrating the three key actors in the story the United States the Sovi

  • Title: Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan
  • Author: Tsuyoshi Hasegawa
  • ISBN: 9780674016934
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Hardcover
  • With startling revelations, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa rewrites the standard history of the end of World War II in the Pacific By fully integrating the three key actors in the story the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan Hasegawa for the first time puts the last months of the war into international perspective From April 1945, when Stalin broke the Soviet Japanese NeuWith startling revelations, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa rewrites the standard history of the end of World War II in the Pacific By fully integrating the three key actors in the story the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan Hasegawa for the first time puts the last months of the war into international perspective From April 1945, when Stalin broke the Soviet Japanese Neutrality Pact and Harry Truman assumed the presidency, to the final Soviet military actions against Japan, Hasegawa brings to light the real reasons Japan surrendered From Washington to Moscow to Tokyo and back again, he shows us a high stakes diplomatic game as Truman and Stalin sought to outmaneuver each other in forcing Japan s surrender, as Stalin dangled mediation offers to Japan while secretly preparing to fight in the Pacific, as Tokyo peace advocates desperately tried to stave off a war party determined to mount a last ditch defense, and as the Americans struggled to balance their competing interests of ending the war with Japan and preventing the Soviets from expanding into the Pacific Authoritative and engrossing, Racing the Enemy puts the final days of World War II into a whole new light.

    One thought on “Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan”

    1. The American retelling of World War II has the Japanese conceding defeat as a result of the two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6th and 9th 1945, respectively. This is widely accepted in our education system. Specialist Tsuyoshi Hasegawa is part of a group of individuals who prefer to take a broader approach to the events that led to the culmination of the war. By examining the triangulation of the Soviet Union, the United States, and Japan, the author reasons that three [...]

    2. Re-read it for the test and found it lacking in sophistication somehow. Much less exciting than first time reading it.

    3. I started out enjoying the book but I couldn't finish it. It got bogged down in minutia - too many details of everyone who attend every meeting and

    4. IN THIS BOOK, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa writes about the circumstances surrounding the end of WWII and the surrender of Japan. He examines the relationship between Stalin, Truman, and the Japanese government. By focusing on the political game that is played between the three, Hasegawa creates a clear picture showing that each respective party is trying to end the war for their own benefit and under the terms most acceptable to them. While revealing the details of these complex relationships, Hasegawa co [...]

    5. A gripping account of the last few months of the Second World War, almost exclusively from a diplomatic point of view. If you're looking for details on the battles or eyewitness accounts from ground-level you won't find them here, this is a book about relations between the highest officials of the US, Japan and the Soviet Union.

    6. A thoroughly researched, thoughtful study that shatters the American-held myth that the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were decisive in Japan's unconditional surrender.

    7. A really interesting book that has received renewed interest on the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki bombings. Much of what Hasegawa says will anger both the standard US view of the atomic bombs rule in ending the Pacific War and the revisionist school of historians. Starting in the 1960s many started arguing that the Japanese were only days from surrendering when Truman dropped the bombs out of some combo of veiled threats to the Soviets and racism. Ever since then the traditionalists [...]

    8. In the American mind, the end of the Pacific War is clear. Sure, there might be debates on the morality of dropping the bomb, but the standard narrative is that the bomb made the final push to convince Japan to surrender and saved both American and Japanese lives. Hasegawa Tsuyoshi brings in Soviet and Japanese primary sources to offer an alternative view: The U.S. and U.S.S.R were, for a few reasons in an unannounced race to push Japan to surrender on their own terms.To anyone who has some expe [...]

    9. I had not heard of this book until the conclusion was including in a "Taking Sides" book assigned for one of my university classes. I added to my reading list for a research paper on the decision to use the atomic bomb.Published in 2005, "Racing The Enemy" cites Richard Frank's Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire from 1999 and is in turn cited by Max Hastings' Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45 from 2008. Hasegawa takes a view on the end of the war against Japan contrary to [...]

    10. Very well argued example of revisionist (to my mind, although Hasegawa does criticize some elements of the older revisionist position) but very heavy on emphasizing Soviet entry into the war as the key element in the decision by Japan to surrender.Even if I had not read other works, the chapter on "Potsdam: the Turning Point" is heavily conclusionary. Cf. especially "Racing the Enemy: A Critical Look" by Michael Kort, The Historical Society, Boston U, Vol. Vii, No. 3.I was going to transcribe de [...]

    11. An influential book looking at the US, Soviet, and Japanese actions in the final days of World War II. Hasegawa shows that within both the US and the Japanese commands, there were deep divisions about how the end of the war should be handled. Hasegawa further argues that the Soviet declaration of war against Japan, and subsequent invasion of Manchuria, was more influential on the eventual Japanese decision for unconditional surrender than were the use of the atomic bombs. An influential book loo [...]

    12. "In this groundbreaking book, Hasegawa argues that the atomic bombs were not as decisive in bringing about Japan's unconditional surrender as Soviet entry into the Pacific war. Few have so thoroughly documented the complex evasions and Machiavellinism of Japanese, Russian, and, especially, American leaders in the process of war termination" - Herbert P. Bix, Pulitzer Prize-winning author I've learnt that the Americans were desperate to use and to justify the use of the uranium bombs against Japa [...]

    13. Read this for a grad class and loved it! Wonderful, if insanely dense, play-by-play of US-USSR-Japanese relations regarding the Pacific War, culminating in the dropping of the atomic bomb and the Japanese surrender. Anyone who gives a hoot about history has probably encountered the historiography/debate surrounding the use of the atomic bomb, but few sources, at least in my own experience, come at it from such a international perspective. All three nations are examined in detail, and it truly re [...]

    14. This is a very detailed book and I really enjoyed it. It mainly covers the last few months of WW2 in the Pacific although it goes back to the Yalta Conference.The incredible twists and turns in Imperial Japan leading up to the surrender are very well laid out.Stalin's focus on grabbing everything he could before the war was "officially" over lead him to continue to invade islands after the official surrender.The author also discusses the impact of the 2 atomic/nuclear bombs on Japanese perceptio [...]

    15. A highly detailed study of the two races toward the end of WW II in the Pacific: between the US and Russia to maximize their national interests, and between the war and peace factions in Japan. No heroes; no villains. There is plenty here to evaluate the morality and desirability of the atomic bombings.

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