The Park and the People: A History of Central Park

The Park and the People A History of Central Park This exemplary social history Kirkus Reviews is the first full scale account of Central Park ever published Elizabeth Blackmar and Roy Rosenzweig tell the story of Central Park s people the merchants

  • Title: The Park and the People: A History of Central Park
  • Author: Roy Rosenzweig Elizabeth Blackmar
  • ISBN: 9780801497513
  • Page: 269
  • Format: Paperback
  • This exemplary social history Kirkus Reviews is the first full scale account of Central Park ever published Elizabeth Blackmar and Roy Rosenzweig tell the story of Central Park s people the merchants and landowners who launched the project the immigrant and African American residents who were displaced by the park the politicians, gentlemen, and artists who disputedThis exemplary social history Kirkus Reviews is the first full scale account of Central Park ever published Elizabeth Blackmar and Roy Rosenzweig tell the story of Central Park s people the merchants and landowners who launched the project the immigrant and African American residents who were displaced by the park the politicians, gentlemen, and artists who disputed its design and operation the German gardeners, Irish laborers, and Yankee engineers who built it and the generations of New Yorkers for whom Central Park was their only backyard In tracing the park s history, Blackmar and Rosenzweig give us the history of New York, and bring to life larger issues about the meaning of the word public in a democratic society.

    One thought on “The Park and the People: A History of Central Park”

    1. The meaning of public space is the topic of Roy Rosenzweig and Elizabeth Blackmar’s The Park and the People: A History of Central Park, which follows New York’s most famous green space from initial conception to its contemporary use. Combining urban, political and design history with a New Social history lens, the authors give an overview of the park as both a physical space and abstract embodiment of public ideals, resulting in both the familiar narrative of American ingenuity as well as a [...]

    2. This history of NYC’s iconic public park reframes its history as one of a battle for space by classes. From its very founding, which cleared out black and irish communities to make room for a place for the city’s elites to compete with European elites in beauty, as well as push for a social setting for elites to mingle and the idea that all residents of the city would benefit by access to seeing a natural environment. The poor immigrant and black residents of the city were systematically exc [...]

    3. This is a history of Central Park that focuses on the people: both the upper and lower classes. While planners and upper class New Yorkers have claimed that “the Park” would be for all people and hopefully encourage moral uplift, it took time for the lower class to negotiate its place and rights within a generally upperclass endeavor. While there are a few fascinating stories in the twentieth century (Robert Moses for example and the privitization of public facilities beginning in the 1970s) [...]

    4. I read this book or a grad school class on urban history and liked it overall, but man was it a beast to read. Over 500 pages and 150 years of park history are crammed into this book.The authors make the argument that Central Park was important for NYC history, and also US history, as a meeting place of different social classes, which helped America become more democratic. While some of that argument is convincing (esp. it's role on NYC history), the impact on American history overall isn't as w [...]

    5. Good history of Central Park, if somewhat frustrating. (I really wanted to like it given the author - I expected more of a pure social history from Saint Roy.)That being said, it is not *bad* by any means. Feels like there is way too much emphasis on the people at the top of the project. The labor and people who used the park feel somewhat glossed over. Also, the last 50 years seems terribly crammed in - it really should merit more than a single chapter.Does a good job of laying out the politica [...]

    6. A thorough and judicious appraisal of the history of Central Park, viewed through the question of whose park is it anyway? No mere dry recitation of people and events, Rosenzweig and Blackmar look at the sociological implications of a public park that often caters to private interests in one of the most racially and economically diverse cities in the world. Filled with noteworthy trivia (the sheep of Sheep Meadow were exiled to Brooklyn!) and excellent and tying together the narrative strands of [...]

    7. An exhaustive read on Central Park, offering both a historical and a contemporary perspective on the park and the people within and around it.

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