The Transnational Villagers

The Transnational Villagers Contrary to popular opinion increasing numbers of migrants continue to participate in the political social and economic lives of their countries of origin even as they put down roots in the United

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  • Title: The Transnational Villagers
  • Author: Peggy Levitt
  • ISBN: 9780520228139
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Paperback
  • Contrary to popular opinion, increasing numbers of migrants continue to participate in the political, social, and economic lives of their countries of origin even as they put down roots in the United States The Transnational Villagers offers a detailed, compelling account of how ordinary people keep their feet in two worlds and create communities that span borders PeggyContrary to popular opinion, increasing numbers of migrants continue to participate in the political, social, and economic lives of their countries of origin even as they put down roots in the United States The Transnational Villagers offers a detailed, compelling account of how ordinary people keep their feet in two worlds and create communities that span borders Peggy Levitt explores the powerful familial, religious, and political connections that arise between Miraflores, a town in the Dominican Republic, and Jamaica Plain, a neighborhood in Boston and examines the ways in which these ties transform life in both the home and host country.The Transnational Villagers is one of only a few books based on in depth fieldwork in the countries of origin and reception It provides a moving, detailed account of how transnational migration transforms family and work life, challenges migrants ideas about race and gender, and alters life for those who stay behind as much, if not , than for those who migrate It calls into question conventional thinking about immigration by showing that assimilation and transnational lifestyles are not incompatible In fact, in this era of increasing economic and political globalization, living transnationally may become the rule rather than the exception.

    One thought on “The Transnational Villagers”

    1. Re-reading it for my immigrant integration class. Looking forward to class discussion. Students usually engage with this book quite well.They did not disappoint this year we had quite a dynamic discussion on whether transnationalism is compatible with immigrant integration.

    2. In this book, Peggy Levitt explores the nature of the transnational village of Miraflores, which exists not only in the Dominican Republic, but also in Boston, Massachusetts. Rather than being two different communities, she argues, each location is inexorably tied with and dependent upon the other in such a way that they actually are the same social entity. The migrants that move to Boston may become integrated into the United States in some ways, but they remain not only loyal, but active in th [...]

    3. i feel . ambivalent. there were a few things i thought were useful about the book - better sense of the history of US-Caribbean relations, DR history, o.k. analysis of "gender" and "race" . i guess it was good to read the individual quotes alongside the contextual analysis, i just feel like something is missing. maybe i have put my acacdemic brain aside for too long but it doesnt seem that levitt has a clear thesis. it's hard for me to get into this book without knowing what her point is.

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