Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It (The Bedford Series in History and Culture)

Other People s Money and How the Bankers Use It The Bedford Series in History and Culture A key document in the Progressive era Other People s Money conveys a sense of moral outrage and political anger over the costs of the industrialization of the United States on traditional social and

  • Title: Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It (The Bedford Series in History and Culture)
  • Author: Louis D. Brandeis Melvin I. Urofsky
  • ISBN: 9780312103149
  • Page: 258
  • Format: Paperback
  • A key document in the Progressive era, Other People s Money conveys a sense of moral outrage and political anger over the costs of the industrialization of the United States on traditional social and political values A thorough introduction and questinos for considerations accompany the full text of Louis Brandeis s 1914 work.

    One thought on “Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It (The Bedford Series in History and Culture)”

    1. Before he was a supreme court justice, Louis Brandeis wrote a series of articles for Harper’s Magazine that he fleshed out and expanded into this book. He was arguing for greater regulation, oversight, and openness in the banking industry after a series of collapses and scandals that caused a lot of harm. I have to confess I skimmed most of it – it was about people I only vaguely knew about involved in crashes I knew less of. But it had some great quotes. This one, particularly, jumped out a [...]

    2. "Das Geld der Anderen" ist ein 100 Jahre altes Buch - und das merkt man an allen Ecken und Kanten. Aber: Das stört nicht im Geringsten, denn trotz Allem kann man ihm eine gewisse Aktualität nicht absprechen.Zu der Zeit, als Brandeis (der ein geachteter Spezialist und aktiver Mann des Volkes war) es schrieb, machten J.P. Morgan und Konsorten gerade von sich reden. Ihre Macht nahm damals ihren Ausgang - und Brandeis benutzt ihr Beispiel um aufzuzeigen, wie schnell der Wohlstand eines ganzen Volk [...]

    3. Brandies was the forefather of counseling in law. Before him lawyers were like doctors of today, coming to a patient's (client's) aid AFTER the fact. Brandies was the founder of preventative law. He was also an early pro-bono advocate, donating much of his time to charity cases. Some critics felt he was naive in his thinking (specifically related to trust busting but also other areas of idealism) but much of what he did was for the good of the layperson and also at the forefront of altruistic th [...]

    4. Louis Brandeis's Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It is a classic critique of the power Wall Street and financiers can wield.The populist lawyer and later Supreme Court justice often critiqued and identified concentrated power as harmful to democracy.In Other People's Money, Brandeis lays out his argument against the banks and Wall Street.Brandeis claims that a small number of bankers use the people's own money deposits as the basis to control industry and finance. This power is then [...]

    5. Louis Brandeis's Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It is a classic critique of the power Wall Street and financiers can wield.The populist lawyer and later Supreme Court justice often critiqued and identified concentrated power as harmful to democracy.In Other People's Money, Brandeis lays out his argument against the banks and Wall Street.Brandeis claims that a small number of bankers use the people's own money deposits as the basis to control industry and finance. This power is then [...]

    6. The context is the Progressive Era in the U.S. that is, early 20th century. Therefore, some of the remedies Judge Brandeis suggests have either been implemented into law or no longer relevant in this era of outsourcing and globalization. Yet, his analysis about the greed of the ultra-rich is accurate and the conditions today are likely worse than his day. It is an important read for its historical context of capitalism, why that economic system will never meet the needs of the lower classes and [...]

    7. I assigned this as the first reading for and the second half U.S. Survey course and while I found the subject matter interesting the overall effect was less than satisfactory. I found myself bored reading the entire primary source, although the introductory essay by Melvin Urofsky was very good. The students have real trouble with the material--they got lost in the details and the economic ideas went over their heads. Instead of being challenging, as I hoped, it was simply confusing. I do not pl [...]

    8. by the man behind "the curse of bigness." here brandeis marshals the facts and persuasively shows how concentrations of $ & power are deadly for democracy. not easy to read but contains great fundamentals on what a bank and a stockbroker actually are/ do.

    9. I thought this book was insanely boring. It took me a long time to read because I'd read around ten pages then fall asleep. But, I'm not the target audience for this book. It was a requirement for a class.

    10. Although the numbers and the people are different today, the ways the banks use other peoples money hasn't changed much, just got more sophisticated.

    11. Because it is so fact-specific and assumes familiarity with hen-contemporaneous corporations and financial system, it does not age well.

    12. Much of this book is dated (still interesting if you like the history) - but a whole lot of it is just as relevant. A quick read too.

    13. Brandeis is a big-government blowhard who is jealous of anyone who is successful on their own terms. He fails to understand how the economy and the world really work.

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