Between Pulpit and Pew: The Supernatural World in Mormon History and Folklore

Between Pulpit and Pew The Supernatural World in Mormon History and Folklore Cain wanders the frontier as a Bigfoot like hairy beast and confronts an early Mormon apostle An evil band of murderers from Mormon scripture known as the Gadianton robbers provides an excuse for th

  • Title: Between Pulpit and Pew: The Supernatural World in Mormon History and Folklore
  • Author: W. Paul Reeve Michael Scott Van Wagenen
  • ISBN: 9780874218220
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Cain wanders the frontier as a Bigfoot like hairy beast and confronts an early Mormon apostle An evil band of murderers from Mormon scripture, known as the Gadianton robbers, provides an excuse for the failure of a desert town Stories of children raised from the dead with decayed bodies and damaged minds help draw boundaries between the proper spheres of human and divineCain wanders the frontier as a Bigfoot like hairy beast and confronts an early Mormon apostle An evil band of murderers from Mormon scripture, known as the Gadianton robbers, provides an excuse for the failure of a desert town Stories of children raised from the dead with decayed bodies and damaged minds help draw boundaries between the proper spheres of human and divine action Mormons who observe UFOs in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries find ways to explain them in relation to the church s cosmology The millenarian dimension of that belief system induces church members to invest in the Dream Mine, a hidden treasure that a would be heir to Joseph Smith wraps in prophecy of the end times A Utah version of Nessie haunts a large mountain lake Non Mormons attempt to discredit Joseph Smith with tales that he had tried and failed to walk on water.Mormons gave distinctive meanings to supernatural legends and events, but their narratives incorporated motifs found in many cultures Many such historical legends and beliefs found adherents down to the present This collection employs folklore to illuminate the cultural and religious history of a people.

    One thought on “Between Pulpit and Pew: The Supernatural World in Mormon History and Folklore”

    1. When I was a pup, I remember being out on a hike with my troop of Boy Scouts. It was the late 1980's, and we were in the high Uintas, a mountain range in Eastern Utah. I was growing tired of my comrades, and lagged behind enough that I could hear myself thinkd suddenly felt like I was being watched. "Cain," I thought, and ran until I was back with my group. At some point in my life, I had learned the bit of Mormon folklore that Cain, son of Adam and Eve and the first murderer on our shiny new pl [...]

    2. The book is a collection of articles on Mormon folklore and urban legends. The beginning of the book chronicles a LDS urban legend that spread via email a few years ago. The story supposedly came from a talk by Boyd K. Packer. However, he never made the statement and the LDS Church struggled to stop the spread of the story. The author believes some of the ideas in the story may have originated from a talk given by motivational speaker Jack Marshall. The talk was mentioned in Brad Wilcox's Tips f [...]

    3. Bigfoot and Cain, UFO's, the Bear Lake Monster, a Dream Mine for end times, walking on water, raising the dead, and Gadianton ghosts. "Between Pulpit and Pew" is a collection of essays on Mormon history and folklore. A really fun little collection--quirky, engaging, sympathetic, and academic all at once.

    4. If you live in a predominantly Mormon area, you may have heard stories linking the biblical Cain to Bigfoot, or whispers about the Bear Lake Monster. Have you ever wanted to know more about the intersection between Mormonism and the supernatural? Where did these stories originate? Why do they perpetuate? Seven such topics are examined in this recent release from USU Press.

    5. Not what I was expecting, but fabulous nonetheless. I thought that this book would be a straightforward telling of supernatural Mormon stories, instead, it's a academic look at how these stories developed and continue to evolve.

    6. Each of the articles is written by a different author, so it is hard to rate the whole book. Suffice it to say, some of the articles are more entertaining than others. Not a major source of profundities, but an entertaining read that can be easily skimmed.

    7. I enjoyed this collection of studies about some Mormon folklore. I learned a few things about my culture that I had never even heard of!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *