Mr. Semolina-Semolinus: A Greek Folktale

Mr Semolina Semolinus A Greek Folktale A long time ago in Greece there lived a beautiful princess named Areti She had many suitors but none she liked so she decided to make one from semolina almonds and sugar Out of the bowl climbed t

  • Title: Mr. Semolina-Semolinus: A Greek Folktale
  • Author: Anthony L. Mann Giselle Potter Christodoula Mitakidou
  • ISBN: 9780689866982
  • Page: 357
  • Format: Paperback
  • A long time ago, in Greece, there lived a beautiful princess named Areti She had many suitors, but none she liked so she decided to make one from semolina, almonds, and sugar Out of the bowl climbed the most handsome man Areti had ever seen Mr Semolina Semolinus, a man beautiful than love itself, and twice as rare So when an evil queen far away steals Areti sA long time ago, in Greece, there lived a beautiful princess named Areti She had many suitors, but none she liked so she decided to make one from semolina, almonds, and sugar Out of the bowl climbed the most handsome man Areti had ever seen Mr Semolina Semolinus, a man beautiful than love itself, and twice as rare So when an evil queen far away steals Areti s beloved, what does she do She orders three pairs of iron shoes, and sets off on a daring rescue attempt, for nothing will stand between this princess and her dreams.

    One thought on “Mr. Semolina-Semolinus: A Greek Folktale”

    1. Type: Picture bookLiterary genre: Folk literatureSummary: A princess is not interested in any of her suitors, so she decides to create her own man to love. She mixes him up in a bowl and makes him to be the most beautiful, kind man that anyone has ever met. She names him Mr. Semolina-Semolinus, after one of the ingredients used to create him. The princess is so happy with her new man, but others notice him too. A queen organizes the capture of Mr. Semolina-Semolinus, so she can have him for hers [...]

    2. This collaboration (Manna & Mitakidou) is wonderful! Giselle Potter's illustrations are lovely. "One time in a time" somewhere in Greece, Areti lived. She was the daughter of a king and wanted only the kindest and most beautiful of suitors, but was disappointed by the many who came to her door. So! She proceeded to create a marzipan of sorts, which responded to her prayers to God and . . . became that kindest, most beautiful suitor. By the way, Areti's name means virtuous. Well, a good thing [...]

    3. It's nice to read a story where the princess is the hero rather than the prince, though I felt that Mr. Semolina-Semolinus himself lacked personality and functioned more as an object to be fought/argued over rather than a person. I think slightly experienced readers have much to gain from the book's array of tier two language and rich plot. They may enjoy comparing this story to other fairy tales where the male is generally the hero or considering ways that Mr. Semolina-Semolinus and character l [...]

    4. This was a version of Mercer Mayer's story "East of the Sun West of the Moon." In this variation, Princess Areti creates the perfect man out of semolina, almonds and sugar. He is stolen away from her by an evil queen, so Areti (which means virtue in Greek) searches the whole world to find him. After receiving three gifts from the sun, moon and stars, she tries to win back her love and eventually succeeds. I love the illustrations from Giselle Potter, especially the end pages which feature elemen [...]

    5. A fun story that introduces children to Greek Folklore and allows them to experience the role reversal of a princess being the hero, rather than the prince. The illustrations within the book were created with colored ink and pencil. They capture an airy dreamlike world in which Areti seeks her beloved Mr. Semolina-Simolinus. Potter adds child-like, whimsical Greek design elements in the story, such as the soft muted powdery colors, village/maritime scenes, strange perspectives, and elongated fig [...]

    6. This book would help teach children to not be selfish and to not take what isn't yours. It is about a princess not making her own man and then a queen from a different place taking him away. The princess goes after him and has things that the queens wants and the queen ends up getting. In the end it shows that if you are patient and not selfish you will get what you want.

    7. We're currently studying Ancient Greece and this was a recommended title for additional reading. It is a Greek Folktale it had elements of other traditional tales such as Rumpelstiltskin and The Gingerbread Man. We enjoyed it. The illustrations are quite whimsical.

    8. This is a Greek Folktale that combines elements of many other folktales from around the world such as the numbers 3 and 7, gold, silver and bronze, and a version of the Rumpelstiltskin tale.

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