Spider Woman's Granddaughters: Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women

Spider Woman s Granddaughters Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women Impressive Haunting EnchantingEvery story in the book which covers nearly a century of tradition is interesting written with intelligent passion THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEWNative American schola

  • Title: Spider Woman's Granddaughters: Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women
  • Author: Paula Gunn Allen
  • ISBN: 9780704342385
  • Page: 166
  • Format: Paperback
  • Impressive.Haunting.EnchantingEvery story in the book, which covers nearly a century of tradition, is interesting, written with intelligent passion THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEWNative American scholar, literary critic, poet, and novelist Paula Gunn Allen, who is herself a Laguna Pueblo Sioux Indian, became increasingly aware in her academic career that the writ Impressive.Haunting.EnchantingEvery story in the book, which covers nearly a century of tradition, is interesting, written with intelligent passion THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEWNative American scholar, literary critic, poet, and novelist Paula Gunn Allen, who is herself a Laguna Pueblo Sioux Indian, became increasingly aware in her academic career that the writings of Native Americans, especially women, have been marginalized by the Western literary canon Allen set out to understand why this was so and, importantly, to remedy the situation The result is this powerful collection of traditional tales, biographical writings, and contemporary short stories, many by the most accomplished Native American women writing today, including Louise Erdrich, Mary TallMountain, Linda Hogan, and many others.

    One thought on “Spider Woman's Granddaughters: Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women”

    1. I thought more about these stories on my morning walk. My siblings and I inherited our mother's difficult and tragic childhood. These stories helped me understand our mamma better. May she and we all walk in peace with beauty all around us.

    2. This book was incredible. Part of what makes it so is that the editor, Paula Gunn Allen, wrote an in-depth introduction so that the non-native reader would understand background conversations among Native writers about their own writing and to introduce cultural nuances of the stories. At the beginning of each section she wrote about the Native concept of that section's title, one of which was warrior, which does not always mean someone who goes to war. She also wrote a brief introduction to eac [...]

    3. This was sort of a mixed bag. Some of the stories were very well-written and moving, but it varied, and with the best there was some frustration at how fragmentary they were. The arrangement was interesting, where often there would be one traditional tale followed by a contemporary tale with similar themes, so you could draw some interesting comparisons that way. The most-irritating segment was by the author. I had not originally seen that, but had been wondering whether she always wrote that wa [...]

    4. This book has many stories written by Native American women.I'm half Native American and I love to read books about Native Americans and learn more about the culture. This book I had found while searching on my library's website and I was very excited to borrow and read it. The stories are very well-written and a few of them I really did like. All the stories were pretty good, but I actually found the whole book to be depressing.Reading this made me realize how much people focus on race, gender, [...]

    5. This is a very intentional anthology--it gives you the feeling that each story in here really made the cut and is here for a reason. Gotta say I never would have guessed there is so much material from Native American women writers. There are many favorites in this collection, but here are a few: "The Woman Who Fell from the Sky," Traditional Mohawk; "As It Was in the Beginning," E. Pauline Johnson; "Yellow Woman," Leslie Marmon Silko; "An American in New York," LeAnne Howe.

    6. I really enjoyed the contemporary fiction and some of the folktales in this collection but I feel there are more compelling collections of writing by Native American women.

    7. Carefully curated collection of short fiction pieces by Native American women, selected to show agency and contemporary connections to the traditional past.

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