We Flew over the Bridge: The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold

We Flew over the Bridge The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold In We Flew over the Bridge one of the country s preeminent African American artists and award winning children s book authors shares the fascinating story of her life Faith Ringgold s artworks startl

  • Title: We Flew over the Bridge: The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold
  • Author: Faith Ringgold
  • ISBN: 9780822335641
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • In We Flew over the Bridge, one of the country s preeminent African American artists and award winning children s book authors shares the fascinating story of her life Faith Ringgold s artworks startling story quilts, politically charged paintings, and hang in the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern AIn We Flew over the Bridge, one of the country s preeminent African American artists and award winning children s book authors shares the fascinating story of her life Faith Ringgold s artworks startling story quilts, politically charged paintings, and hang in the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and other major museums around the world, as well as in the private collections of Maya Angelou, Bill Cosby, and Oprah Winfrey Her children s books, including the Caldecott Honor Book Tar Beach, have sold hundreds of thousands of copies But Ringgold s path to success has not been easy In this gorgeously illustrated memoir, she looks back and shares the story of her struggles, growth, and triumphs Ringgold recollects how she had to surmount a wall of prejudices as she worked to refine her artistic vision and raise a family At the same time, the story she tells is one of warm family memories and sustaining friendships, community involvement, and hope for the future.

    One thought on “We Flew over the Bridge: The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold”

    1. This book reminded me how much I enjoy artist's biographys and focused art histories. My only quibble was that it was organized both thematically and chronology, so it was slightly repetitive and hard to follow in places. My favorite chapters dealt with the questions "Is there a Black Art?" and "Is there a Woman's Art?"

    2. 1995 This felt like Ringgold was really baring her soul as much as she could. Sharing all she could of what her family meant and means to her, all she went through to find her own directions in life, the struggles to get recognition for her artistic efforts, the rocky road of relationships. She is unusually candid about her relationship with her two daughters -- she raised them to be independent and so inevitable there were and are strains. Ringgold's mother was an equally strong personality and [...]

    3. I picked this up by chance, never having heard of Faith Ringgold, and I'm so glad I did. I found it both a lovely introduction to her incredibly varied art - everything from painting to dolls to performance art to "story-quilts" - and a compelling record of her life as a black woman and an artist whose life bridges the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement and beyond. Clear accounts of her extraordinary mother, her difficult relationship with her daughters, and her attempts to create a [...]

    4. I enjoyed Ringgold's autobiography, as it provides a detailed examination of her life, complete with pictures and photographs of her family and her artwork. I agree with other readers that the strongest chapters (for me) were when she discussed the black arts movement and her discussion of what it means to be a black woman artist during the twentieth century. I also love how she described her composition of children's books. In describing African American children's literature, she states: “Th [...]

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