Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar: Stories of Food during Wartime by the World's Leading Correspondents

Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar Stories of Food during Wartime by the World s Leading Correspondents These sometimes harrowing frequently funny and always riveting stories about food and eating under extreme conditions feature the diverse voices of journalists who have reported from dangerous confl

  • Title: Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar: Stories of Food during Wartime by the World's Leading Correspondents
  • Author: Matt Mcallester
  • ISBN: 9780520268678
  • Page: 404
  • Format: Hardcover
  • These sometimes harrowing, frequently funny, and always riveting stories about food and eating under extreme conditions feature the diverse voices of journalists who have reported from dangerous conflict zones around the world during the past twenty years A profile of the former chef to Kim Jong Il of North Korea describes Kim s exacting standards for gourmet fare, whichThese sometimes harrowing, frequently funny, and always riveting stories about food and eating under extreme conditions feature the diverse voices of journalists who have reported from dangerous conflict zones around the world during the past twenty years A profile of the former chef to Kim Jong Il of North Korea describes Kim s exacting standards for gourmet fare, which he gorges himself on while his country starves A journalist becomes part of the inner circle of an IRA cell thanks to his drinking buddies And a young, inexperienced female journalist shares mud crab in a foxhole with an equally young Hamid Karzai Along with tales of deprivation and repression are stories of generosity and pleasure, sometimes overlapping This memorable collection, introduced and edited by Matt McAllester, is seasoned by tragedy and violence, spiced with humor and good will, and fortified, in McAllester s words, with a little humanity than we can usually slip into our newspapers and magazine stories.

    One thought on “Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar: Stories of Food during Wartime by the World's Leading Correspondents”

    1. "No matter what role you have in a conflict, you have to step out of it for at least a few minutesevery day to have breakfast, lunch, dinner—or a piece of bread. Meals put war on hold, even if the guns are still firing outside." These are the lines that got me to start reading thsi book in the first place. Food plays an essential role in human life. It not only nourishes human body,it also is something over which the human race socializes.The best way to make a guest/stranger comfortable is to [...]

    2. This was a really unique look at the role of food during wartime and much more varied than I initially considered it might be. My favorites include "Same-Day Cow (Afghanistan)," which includes the intricate politics of MREs; "A Diet for Dictators (North Korea)," detailing the extravagant culinary preferences of Kim Jong-Il despite his starved nation and how how personally revealing his tastes are beyond our initial assumptions; and "How Harry Lost His Ear (Northern Ireland)," in which a journali [...]

    3. I loved this book. It took me all over the world’s war zones of the past few decades through tales of local food, of eating and not eating during war. We are introduced to Benazir Bhutto, Kim Jong Il, and Ariel Sharon in fascinating and very personal ways that are not usually written about, namely, how they eat. The stories are chock full of history that’s we’ve just lived through but with a behind-the-scenes vantage point that doesn’t show up in the newspapers. Isabel Hilton’s Miracul [...]

    4. Tales from international journalists of their experiences in war zones, and how whatever is going on around them, everybody needs to eat somehow even in the midst of fighting.All fascinating, For me Joshua Hammer's account of his sumptuous meal with a Palestinian warlord, and his subsequent vilification by the Israelis and the pro-Israeli American press for his remark that it was one of the the best meals he'd eaten in Gaza, stands out as a real eye-opener. Jason Burke gives an interesting accou [...]

    5. I mostly loved this collection. The essay on Rwanda in particular was extraordinary.There were two moments in two distinct essays that upset me - a non-Haitian journalist writing on Haiti called Africa a country; a British journalist writing on Afghanistan described people "jabbering" in Pashto - and the essay on Ariel Sharon was so fatphobic and disgusting as to completely undermine the legitimate political point the author was trying to make about illegal land grabs on the West Bank. I felt re [...]

    6. What a fascinating book. The people who are so often little more to us than a byline, who risk their very lives in the quest to bring us the most pressing news from around the globe, are brought to life in this edited volume of stories about food and eating in some of the most conflict ridden zones of the world. Haiti, Iraq, Bosnia, Afghanistan, Israel, Palestine, Rwandae stories cover a lot of historical - and actual - ground and come from some of the most talented journalists of our time. A un [...]

    7. An insightful book that let me into the accounts of war and food. I was a little disappointed with the story of 'Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar' as I had expected the author to have tried the 'mud crab experience' herself to write the article and also for it to be the cover title of the book. Nevertheless, other articles in the book shone and I loved the last chapter on 'House of Bread'. Not to say, I picked up quite a few new vocabulary from this book and am impressed with the way the authors wro [...]

    8. From MREs to turkey testicles, from Haiti to Ossetia, this book was an interesting read from start to finish. Not only does it delve into the food of the general populace in recent war zones, but it also gives insight into the eating habits of who were or would later be influential. Perhaps what really won me over was the inclusion of a few recipes for the dishes discussed. Any book that has a recipe for borek is a winner.

    9. I thoroughly enjoyed the insiders view into war zones and other unsettled places from the perspective of how and what to eat. Each story carries a little gem - of cooking lore, of history, of making do - and, though the stories vary widely, the undercurrent of hunger, the importance of eating together, and the joy that food can bring unite these stories into a wonderful whole.

    10. A wonderfully engrossing assortment of stories of war, horror, humor and food. Tidbits about Kim Jong-il's obscenely rich tastes, Ariel Sharon's (barely) hidden gluttony, the contents of MREs, the favored fusion cuisine of Iranian student protestors and much more. These largely personal tales are crafted by a top-notch assortment of global correspondents and almost every story is a gem.

    11. One of the best books I have read this year. Each journalist offers a stunning combination of food writing to make one salivate and an unjaundiced perspective of geopolitics. Simply amazing.

    12. Riveting accounts from a collection of foreign correspondents about the role food played in their travels. DO NOT read this book when you are hungry!

    13. Very varied writing. Still love the story by Barbara Demick. Also like Joshua Hammer's. Janine di Giovanni's is good too.

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