Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply (Duckworth Archaeology)

Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply Duckworth Archaeology How did a Roman waterworks work How were the aqueducts planned and built What happened to the water before it arrived in the aqueduct and after it left in catchment urban distribution and drainage W

  • Title: Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply (Duckworth Archaeology)
  • Author: A. Trevor Hodge
  • ISBN: 9780715631713
  • Page: 300
  • Format: Paperback
  • How did a Roman waterworks work How were the aqueducts planned and built What happened to the water before it arrived in the aqueduct and after it left, in catchment, urban distribution and drainage What were the hydraulics and drainage involved In a comprehensive, generously illustrated study ranging through the Roman aqueducts of France, Germany, Spain, North Africa,How did a Roman waterworks work How were the aqueducts planned and built What happened to the water before it arrived in the aqueduct and after it left, in catchment, urban distribution and drainage What were the hydraulics and drainage involved In a comprehensive, generously illustrated study ranging through the Roman aqueducts of France, Germany, Spain, North Africa, Turkey and Israel as well as the Roman heartland of Italy, A Trevor Hodge introduces us to these often neglected aspects of what the Romans themselves regarded as one of the greatest glories of their civilisation Roman Aqueducts is now available for the first time in paperback, brought completely up to date with a new Preface and additional Bibliography.

    One thought on “Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply (Duckworth Archaeology)”

    1. This book is a comprehensive introduction to Roman water supply. I'm very interested in Roman waterworks and love examining them at Roman sites I visit but didn't really understand the architectural and engineering elements. This is the book to explain all that. I will follow up on some of the suggested sources in the bibliography but I doubt they will be as approachable as this book. I highly recommend it.

    2. This book was very interesting and informative, but it could have been improved by providing a translation of foreign phrases (there were frequent quotations of Latin and French, and while I was able to determine roughly what they meant, I couldn't figure out the exact meaning) and explaining more about cities and mechanical items. For example, listing the country where the cities were found would have been helpful, as well as giving a brief description of things like the noria and the tympanum. [...]

    3. What can I say, I'm a hydrophile, so here I find myself reading this epic survey of the Romans' extravagant water-delivery systems. Written by a classicist, not an engineer--i.e it's actually approachable--with groovy ideas on every page. It's shaping up to be one of my most rewarding lay-reader jobs.

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