General Chemistry

General Chemistry When it was first published this first year chemistry text revolutionized the teaching of chemistry by presenting it in terms of unifying principles instead of as a body of unrelated facts Those prin

  • Title: General Chemistry
  • Author: Linus Pauling
  • ISBN: 9780486656229
  • Page: 123
  • Format: Paperback
  • When it was first published, this first year chemistry text revolutionized the teaching of chemistry by presenting it in terms of unifying principles instead of as a body of unrelated facts Those principles included modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics In addition, Dr Pauling attempted to correlatWhen it was first published, this first year chemistry text revolutionized the teaching of chemistry by presenting it in terms of unifying principles instead of as a body of unrelated facts Those principles included modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics In addition, Dr Pauling attempted to correlate the theories with descriptive chemistry, the observed properties of substances, to introduce the student to the multitude of chemical substances and their properties.In this extensively revised and updated third edition, the Nobel prizewinning author maintains an excellent balance between theoretical and descriptive material, although the amount of descriptive chemistry has been decreased somewhat, and the presentation of the subject, especially in relation to the nonmetals, has been revised in such a way as to permit greater correlation with the electronic structure of atoms, especially electronegativity The principles of quantum mechanics are discussed on the basis of the de Broglie wavelength of the electron The quantized energy levels of a particle in a box are derived by means of a simple assumption about the relation of the de Broglie waves to the walls of the box No attempt is made to solve the Schr dinger wave equation for other systems, but the wave functions of hydrogen like electrons are presented and discussed in some detail, and the quantum states for other systems are also covered Statistical mechanics is introduced before thermodynamics, and the discussion of thermodynamics is based on it This arrangement reflects the author s belief that beginning students can understand statistical mechanics better than chemical thermodynamics Aimed at first year college students who plan to major in chemistry or closely related fields, the book is written in a logical, clear and understandable style In addition, many excellent figures are included, along with numerous problems and 75 pages of appendixes covering such topics as symmetry of molecules and crystals, hybrid bond orbitals, and magnetic properties of substances.

    One thought on “General Chemistry”

    1. All of our ideas about life involve chemical reactions.Hard as it is for me to believe now, at one point I was on a path to become a chemist. Throughout elementary and high school, I had always been best at science; and chemistry was my favorite subject. By the time I was a junior, I was taking an advanced course with a teacher who now, for me, embodies the archetypical chemist: He had a long white beard (he belonged to a special club of genuinely-bearded Santa Clause impersonators), always wore [...]

    2. Linus Pauling was one of the most influential and gifted scientists of the 20th century and the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. This book was first published in 1947 but subsequently revised and the edition I read was from 1970. It's obviously rather dated in some of its information, but not as much as it could have been. However, as a chemist myself, my interest in reading it was to see if any of Pauling's genius was apparent in his style of writing. Could he, for example, present [...]

    3. One of the best books for advanced students. A sample:"Kinds of DefinitionDefinitions may be either precise or imprecise. The mathematician may define the words that he uses precisely: in his further discussion he then adheres rigorously to the meaning of each word. We have given some precise definitions above. One of them is the definition of the kilogram as the mass of a standard object, the prototype kilogram, that is kept in Paris. Similarly, the gram is rigorously and precisely as 1/1000 th [...]

    4. Great book, but very challengingThis is an excellent book -- definitely a classic. Despite the name there is more physics, especially quantum physics, material than traditional chemistry, but it is an excellent read with some very deep insights into the nature of the universe.

    5. I did not take any Chemistry classes in high school or college, but started reading chemistry books to gain some basic knowledge. I have been working my way back from more advanced Chemistry books to General Chemistry. This was a very long book, but very informative. I found that from reading the more advanced books that most of the concepts in this book seemed relatively simplistic by comparison. I would say that this book is great for anyone just trying to learn a little about General Chemistr [...]

    6. This book strikes a nice balance between remedial knowledge of chemistry and an advanced understanding. It neither talks to you like a stupid college freshman, nor a grad student in a Chem department. It explains all the fundamental concepts of Chemistry but with a speed and use of technical language that assumes you already somewhat understand Math, Physics, and the basic picture of Chemistry. For instance it doesn't go into a long conversation about significant figures or the meaning of expone [...]

    7. I got a copy of this classic text as I approached graduation with my BS in chemistry in 2008. I found Pauling's writing style lucid but as I skimmed the book I was a little shocked that some principles were included in this 'general chemistry' book that I didn't encounter until taking supplement physics courses or physical chemistry. Pauling had high expectations of his students.

    8. Heavy read, Heavy, Heavy. You better freshen up your College Algebra and Calculas or you won't make through this one. But is excellent primary Chemical reference and the way Pauling writes it is more like a story.

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