Hungry for the World: A Memoir

Hungry for the World A Memoir From the author of the critically acclaimed In the Wilderness comes a riveting new narrative of self discovery and personal triumph Hungry for the World is the story of how an intelligent and passion

  • Title: Hungry for the World: A Memoir
  • Author: Kim Barnes
  • ISBN: 9780307773906
  • Page: 143
  • Format: ebook
  • From the author of the critically acclaimed In the Wilderness, comes a riveting new narrative of self discovery and personal triumph Hungry for the World is the story of how an intelligent and passionate young woman, yearning for an understanding of the world beyond her insular family life, found her way.On the day of her 1976 high school graduation in Lewiston, Idaho, KiFrom the author of the critically acclaimed In the Wilderness, comes a riveting new narrative of self discovery and personal triumph Hungry for the World is the story of how an intelligent and passionate young woman, yearning for an understanding of the world beyond her insular family life, found her way.On the day of her 1976 high school graduation in Lewiston, Idaho, Kim Barnes decided she could no longer abide the patriarchal domination of family and church After a disagreement with her father a logger and fervent adherent to the Pentecostal Christian faith she gathered her few belongings and struck out on her own She had no skills and no funds, but she had the courage and psychological sturdiness to make her way, and to eventually survive the influence of a man whose dominance was of a different and menacing sort Hungry for the World is a classic story of the search for knowledge and its consequences, both dire and beautiful.From the Trade Paperback edition.

    One thought on “Hungry for the World: A Memoir”

    1. wow, this lady had an insane childhood. i'd like to know more about her new life, though. she seems to fall into the "but one day i just stopped acting crazy," camp, which seems to be the moral of a lot of the memoirs i've read recently. i'm not sure i how satisfying that reasoning is for th reader, but i guess that's the best explanation people can come up with.

    2. I do not remember reading this book, though I wrote it in my book journal. So I must have. Unmemorable title, perhaps? Uh

    3. I met Kim Barnes at a writer's conference in Southampton, NY. I sat there in the audience as she read from her book, mouth a little hanging open by the end. I was beyond captivated by her stance, words, and incredible talent. I only got to speak with her for a few minutes, but that talk changed me. Just like her writing, she is remarkably compelling and bright.This novel is the telling of her rebellious teen years: how she became defiant, the consequences of her rebellion, and the aftermath of i [...]

    4. This book was kind of a rough read for me, but I appreciate what Barnes was trying to do - reconcile the little girl that she was, with the teenager in rebellion, including her young adult foray into a dark abusive relationship, with the woman she is now. I think that most of us have episodes in our lives, relationships, that we have looked back on later and wondered how that could possibly have been us. I think that the struggle with how to reconcile who we were with who we are is something tha [...]

    5. Unlike Augusten Burrough's disturbing memoir, Barnes's "Hungry for the World" leaves the reader with hope, knowing that while her disturbing experiences as a young adult influence and shape who she is, she has persevered through and come out on the other side relatively "normal", or at least well-balanced. Barnes's writing is detailed, "un-self-pitying" as the cover states. She makes you grieve for her without saying, "look at me, look what I endured, look what was done to me." Here is honest re [...]

    6. Read this as part of the summer reading program at the local public library. Fairly difficult read for me as I can identify pretty closely with some of the struggles the heroine experiences on her way to adulthood. Set in beautiful North Idaho where I would like to visit at some point and maybe do some hunting and fishing. One of the saddest things about the memoir is the way that the fundamentalist Pentecostal church the author and her family attended misrepresented the God of the Bible. God is [...]

    7. I thought this book started out beautifully--when this woman described what it was like to be a little girl who worshipped her father, her voice was so true and beautiful--I though I was going to love this book. But the lion's share of the book was her story of horrible degradation, lots of blaming, and then at the end of the book she has come through it somehow, to a good life. She never explains what happened to make that amazing change in her life--just a few platitudes--which I believe would [...]

    8. I found Kim Barnes after reading her novel In the Kingdom of Men. I read her memoir of her early years (In the Wilderness) and then went on to the sequel, in which she strives to become her own person despite her father, and now her mother, who try to force her to accept the restrictions of their strict Pentecostal faith. She resists, only to fall prey to controlling boyfriend who nearly destroys her.

    9. I devoured this memoir. It is raw and real and painful and beautiful. But even more than that, it tugs at my heart and rips open my childhood and growing up memories. I suspect that only those of us born and raised in Idaho, having experienced that tug between sense of place and wanderlust, can really understand some parts of this story but it is told in a way that makes it accessible to everyone.

    10. This is an exceptionally good memoir. The author was raised in a strict Pentecostal family and as she struggles to break free from her family, she goes through some life-altering changes when she strikes out on her own after high school graduation. Kim Barnes writes beautifully about her experience of discovering herself.

    11. I can relate to Kim's experience, she is just 3 yrs younger than me. It was probably hard to document her young life, now that she has become successful and content w/ her life. She grew up in the same area of Idaho as my husband so it was fun to recognize where she lives and share her appreciation of the wilderness and the lifestyle back in the logging camps that no longer exist.

    12. This book was really good for me ~ because I identified with the author. I felt a communion with her ~ I had a very similar relationship and I knew what she was feeling and why.If you have never been through something like that ~ I'm not sure someone would get what she was saying ~ but I did.

    13. This story read like fiction. The author spirals out of control but justifies her choices by saying making bad choices is better than making no choices. she strikes out against the rigidity of her family life only to find herself bound (literally and figuratively) by another man,similar in many ways to her father. I wish you could give 1/2 star ratings. this book should be 3.5 stars

    14. I fell in love with this book. I normally don't favor memoirs but it's written so well that I felt as if I were in the authors shoes. very different from any other book I've read and I never knew what to expect next. I kept reading it every chance I got :)

    15. A rather disturbing book, which doesn't exactly explain how she ended up with a husband & children. One day she is with a creep, doing drugs, being promiscuous, and suddenly she has a husband a 2 children. Explain.

    16. A beautifully written memoir by Kim Barnes of growning up in logging camps of Idaho,and her life in Lewiston,Id. It deals with rebellion towards her religious family, making bad decisions and finally having the courage to make a good life for herself.

    17. Enjoyed this memoir, but not as much as the first "Into the Wilderness". Kim is an excellent writer and knows how to tell a story that will stay with you for a long time. I love her prose.

    18. Was unsure why she needed to tread this ground again, and not sure what I gained when I covered it, other than a feeling that she made poor choices in her life and in her writing.

    19. Historical, late 70's, female growing up in small Idaho town, religious, repressive, Pentecostal family, wild to submissive to dark to light. Much admiration for this author.

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