Historical and literary memorials of the city of London

Historical and literary memorials of the city of London Purchase of this book includes free trial access to million books where you can read than a million books for free This is an OCR edition with typos Excerpt from book CHAPTER III DRURY LANE AND CONTIG

  • Title: Historical and literary memorials of the city of London
  • Author: John Heneage Jesse
  • ISBN: 2940019027842
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Nook
  • Purchase of this book includes free trial access to million books where you can read than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book CHAPTER III DRURY LANE AND CONTIGUOUS STREETS Drury LaneDrury HouseWych StreetDrury Lane TheatreLong AcrePhoenix AlleyQueen StreetLincoln s Inn FieldsPortugal StreetDuke StreePurchase of this book includes free trial access to million books where you can read than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book CHAPTER III DRURY LANE AND CONTIGUOUS STREETS Drury Lane Drury House Wych Street Drury Lane Theatre Long Acre Phoenix Alley Queen Street Lincoln s Inn Fields Portugal Street Duke Street St Giles s Church and Churchyard Drury Lane derives its name from having been built nearly on the site of Drury House, the residence of the once powerful family of the Drurys It is singular, says Pennant, that this lane, of later times so notorious for intrigues, should derive its title from a family name, which, in the language of Chaucer, had an amorous signification Of bataille and of chevalrie, Of ladies love and druerie, Anon I wool you tell Drury House, which stood where Craven Buildings and the Olympic Theatre now stand, is said to have been built by the gallant and courtly Sir William Drury, Lord Deputy of Ireland in the reign of Queen Elizabeth and a Knight of the Garter, who was killed in a duel with Sir John Burroughs, on account of a quarrel between them on an absurd question of precedency He was succeeded by his son, Sir Robert Drury, in whose lifetime the celebrated Doctor Donne found a welcome refuge in Drury House during the days of his poverty Here, too, it was, that the unfortunate Earl of Essex and his friends met secretly to plan the rash conspiracy, which ended in as fatal a catastrophe Some time after the death of Sir Robert Drury this property came into the possession of William,Lord Craven, the gay courtier of the reign of James the Second, the hero of the tremendous breach of Creutznach, and the presumed husband of the charming Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia Lord Craven pulled down the old mansion of the Drurys, and built on its site a large brick pile, in which we find the Queen of Bohemia residing sh

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