Between Two Worlds

Between Two Worlds Set in Soweto outside Johannesburg Between Two Worlds is one of the most important novels of South Africa under apartheid Originally published under the title Muriel at Metropolitan the novel was fo

  • Title: Between Two Worlds
  • Author: Miriam Tlali
  • ISBN: 9781551116051
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Paperback
  • Set in Soweto outside Johannesburg, Between Two Worlds is one of the most important novels of South Africa under apartheid Originally published under the title Muriel at Metropolitan, the novel was for some years banned on the grounds of language derogatory to Afrikaners even as it received worldwide acclaim It was later issued in the Longman African Writers Series, buSet in Soweto outside Johannesburg, Between Two Worlds is one of the most important novels of South Africa under apartheid Originally published under the title Muriel at Metropolitan, the novel was for some years banned on the grounds of language derogatory to Afrikaners even as it received worldwide acclaim It was later issued in the Longman African Writers Series, but has for some years been out of print and unavailable.This Broadview edition includes a new introduction by the author describing the circumstances in which she wrote Between Two Worlds.

    One thought on “Between Two Worlds”

    1. This was an odd book - it dealt almost exclusively with the protagonist's work life, and was more episodic than plot-driven. Her husband never even got a name. Muriel herself only started to pick up character development about halfway through: for the most part she is an observer and commentator on the world around her.I did really like this book, though. Muriel's internal POV is a nice place to be: wry, insightful, starkly aware of the race politics around her, but generous to everyone. The pro [...]

    2. Written from the perspective of a black working woman in South Africa during apartheid. Reminds me in some aspects of things I've read about the South (of America) Institutionalized racism, stupid rules (can't use the same bathrooms), a certain degree of anger and fear, a certain degree of resignation. I don't know much about South Africa, so I don't know how historically accurate this is, but Muriel's story is frustrating. So many of the characters want change, but are unsure of or scared of ho [...]

    3. Muriel is an office worker at Metropolitan Radio, a shop in Johannesburg selling radios and household goods to both 'white' and mostly 'black' people. Many of the customers buy goods on an installment plan; many of them are unable to pay the installments. Muriel is 'black' but has to work in close proximity to 'white' office workers. In this book, Muriel describes many episodes during her career at Metropolitan during the 1970s, in the depth of the apartheid era in South Africa.This book provide [...]

    4. This is a quite interesting book. Episodic, with details almost thrown in--it takes until the middle of the book to discover Muriel is married with children, for example. Muriel is an excellent observer, and the book is a commentary on all that is going around her. In that sense, it allows oneself to understand her experience, and is quite realistic in that way. It's political but delivered in a way that is engaging and wry, not didactically.

    5. You'd think a book describing a Black woman's experience during apartheid-era South Africa would be interesting--but it's not.

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