A Primer of Jungian Psychology

A Primer of Jungian Psychology The contributions of Carl Gustav Jung to the understanding of the human psyche are immense Starting as Freud s most famous disciple Jung soon broke away from his mentor to follow his own lines of inv

  • Title: A Primer of Jungian Psychology
  • Author: Calvin Springer Hall Vernon J. Nordby
  • ISBN: 9780451625786
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Paperback
  • The contributions of Carl Gustav Jung to the understanding of the human psyche are immense Starting as Freud s most famous disciple, Jung soon broke away from his mentor to follow his own lines of investigation discovery Many of Jung s ideas are now considered fundamentals in the study of the mind, but other, controversial theories dealing with the psychologicThe contributions of Carl Gustav Jung to the understanding of the human psyche are immense Starting as Freud s most famous disciple, Jung soon broke away from his mentor to follow his own lines of investigation discovery Many of Jung s ideas are now considered fundamentals in the study of the mind, but other, controversial theories dealing with the psychological relevance of alchemy, ESP, astrology occultism are only now being seriously examined This condensation summary of Jung s life work by two eminent psychology professors is written with deep understanding extraordinary clarity is essential reading for anyone interested in the hidden depths of the mind.

    One thought on “A Primer of Jungian Psychology”

    1. ایراداتی از قبیل این که وارد دسته بندی بشی و فقط الف رو گفته باشه و گذشته باشه دیده میشه؛ ولی در کل خیلی ساده و منسجم توضیح داده هرچیزی رو که گفته. برای شروعِ یونگ گزینه‌ی خوبیه.

    2. This primer lays out Jung’s thinking in a systematic and cohesive way. In a nutshell, the authors say of Jung that we are born whole but, as we develop and operate in the world, we stray from our true self. We emphasize certain parts of our psyche too much and our personality becomes “lopsided.” Jung’s goal is to restore balance by rediscovering the wholeness that was once there but has been lost. This is about self-realization. It’s a “drawing out…of something that is already ther [...]

    3. Having brushed up on my Freud, I moved on to Jung, who always strikes me as the psychological equivalent of a tarot card reader. That said, I'm far more willing to buy into his theories of balanced opposing forces than I am into Freud's grand conviction that I spent my childhood wanting to make out with my Dad.As with his Primer of Freudian Psychology, Hall (this time with co-author Vernon Nordby, which has to be one of the great unused hero names of 19th century novels) provides a brief overvie [...]

    4. A fair introduction to Jung's analytical psychology. Calvin S. Hall also did an introduction to Freud's psychoanalysis. Neither are very demanding.

    5. Absolutely fascinating read about the human psyche. The Anima and Animus provide great insight on how humans (personalities) relate with eachother and ultimately the universe. Have read this extremely thought-provoking "work" multiple times and will continue to do so. Christine

    6. A short overview of Jung's ideas about the 8 types of personality and the importance of symbols and archetypes.

    7. Over the past few years of consuming somewhat haphazardly-selected readings in cognitive science and psychology, the name Carl Jung has appeared time and time again with increasing frequency, seemingly proportional to just how far down the rabbit hole I've fallen, aware or unaware. However, in the past half year, I became very interested in the work of the clinical psychologist Jordan B. Peterson, specifically in his work concerning personality. Having made it through the entirety of only one of [...]

    8. Like many other reviewers, I found this to be a satisfactory, albeit brief introduction to C.G. Jung's thought. For those interested in further reading, like Calvin S. Hall and Vernon J. Nordby, I would suggest Memories, Dreams, Reflections by C.G. Jung and C.G. Jung and Hermann Hesse by Miguel Serrano. Here are some quotes and passages I found interesting from the text (attributed to C.G. Jung):On ComplexesA man does not have a complex; the complex has him.On the Artist-ArchetypeHe is fated to [...]

    9. Back in college where I studied Psychology as my major, we were introduced to Jung. We would read his works because we had to make and submit book reports to our teachers. And I had teachers who preferred that we churn out the exact words that Jung (and the other pioneers) said in his books during our exams; some of them must have thought we would remember the concepts years after. But I barely remember anything I read about him (except, perhaps, his book on 'Man & His Symbols') until I star [...]

    10. I found this a practical, intelligent introduction to Jung's collected works. I found it while browsing my college library's shelves and thought it would be handy and I am now pleased that I found it. I was keenly interested in a chapter later in the book but decided to read the entire book since it is, afterall, a primer; now, I want to read Jung directly and believe that I know where to start. Jung had a mind for the humanities and read widely and deeply. When I grow up, I want to be just like [...]

    11. Great intro to Jung. Of course, with any introductory and comprehensive summary of a theorists work, it's someone elses opinion on his writings. Read Jung's works, specifically Memories, Dreams, Reflections, after reading this to get a really good feel for Jung himself. If you want to learn about Jungian Psychology, read his collected works vol. 9: Archetypes and the collective unconscious.

    12. This was the first book I read in an attempt to get my head around Jung. It helped, but I soon discovered that it's best to go to the source: the man himself and his own writings. This was useful as an intro, but for the kind of work I was doing (writing a thesis) more in-depth studies were wanting.

    13. If I were less jet lagged, I'd write an actual review. As it is, the two stars are more for the presentation given by these authors. I was really interested to learn something about Jungian psychology, of which I knew nothing before.

    14. Nice overview of a few basic key concepts of Jungian analysis. A good intro for the neophyte. If you are interested in Jung's theory make sure to start with Man and his Symbols and then progress to more theoretically weighted works by Jung.

    15. Finally, I got around to finishing this book. I would recommend that persons interested in Jung's work and his perspective on psychology simply read Jung himself.

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