Il Napoleone nero

Il Napoleone nero Terzo capitolo della trilogia sulla rivoluzione di Haiti la rivolta degli schiavi per l indipendenza dalla madrepatria francese riuscita Ma al leader nero Toussaint Louverture non basta e in a

  • Title: Il Napoleone nero
  • Author: Madison Smartt Bell Emiliano Bussolo
  • ISBN: 9788875200497
  • Page: 322
  • Format: Paperback
  • Terzo capitolo della trilogia sulla rivoluzione di Haiti 1802 la rivolta degli schiavi per l indipendenza dalla madrepatria francese riuscita Ma al leader nero, Toussaint Louverture, non basta, e in anticipo di un secolo tenta di abolire per sempre la schiavit dall isola I tempi per non sono ancora maturi e Napoleone invia le sue guarnigioni per riconquistare il coTerzo capitolo della trilogia sulla rivoluzione di Haiti 1802 la rivolta degli schiavi per l indipendenza dalla madrepatria francese riuscita Ma al leader nero, Toussaint Louverture, non basta, e in anticipo di un secolo tenta di abolire per sempre la schiavit dall isola I tempi per non sono ancora maturi e Napoleone invia le sue guarnigioni per riconquistare il controllo sui ribelli La resistenza tenace, ma l ombra del tradimento non risparmier lo Spartaco Nero che dovr lasciare per sempre la sua gente Una pagina di storia misconosciuta da troppo tempo.

    One thought on “Il Napoleone nero”

    1. “La Rivoluzione francese sembra magnifica a chi la conosce male, terribile a chi la conosce meglio, grottesca a chi la conosce bene.” Così Nicolás Gómez Dávila liquidava il momento fondante della società democratica borghese. Momento che come ogni altro fenomeno umano porta con sé contraddizioni, chiaroscuri e pieghe insondabili. Le istanze di fratellanza, uguaglianza e libertà francesi trovano la loro contraddizione oltreoceano, nelle colonie, laddove l’universalità di quei valori [...]

    2. This was the last book in Madison Smartt Bell's fictional trilogy of the lives of slaves, French colonists, French military men caught in sweep of the Haitian slave revolt. To anyone reading, please read the books in order, it is the only way to keep track of the enormous cast of characters, fictional and historical. I thought that the trilogy worked because there is no better writing subject than the events of history and those human beings who make it. Second, the writer does the reader a trem [...]

    3. A great conclusion to Bell's historical fiction trilogy of the Haitian Revolution. I started these books with no knowledge of the subject at all. I only knew that I'd enjoyed some of his earlier novels (especially Ten Indians). These books were a dramatic departure from previous works. They are brutally realistic with wonderfully complex characters.

    4. Terminando la recensione del secondo libro della Trilogia, Il Signore dei crocevia, avevo scritto: "Spero in un finale in crescendo". Questo augurio si è avverato solo in parte, purtroppo.Il titolo originale scelto dall'autore per questo libro è The Stone That the Builder Refused, "la pietra scartata dai costruttori", e, ovviamente, è molto più pertinente di quello, molto piatto, attribuito, chissà per quale motivo (i titoli dei precedenti due volumi erano stati tradotti più fedelmente), a [...]

    5. An excellent conclusion to the Haitian Trilogy. And while it would have been nice to have a fourth volume taking us through the death of Dessalines, it would have been bereft of most of the characters we've grown most familiar with since they either left the island or were killed shortly after Toussaint Louverture was taken away to France.

    6. “La Rivoluzione francese sembra magnifica a chi la conosce male, terribile a chi la conosce meglio, grottesca a chi la conosce bene.” Così Nicolás Gómez Dávila liquidava il momento fondante della società democratica borghese. Momento che come ogni altro fenomeno umano porta con sé contraddizioni, chiaroscuri e pieghe insondabili. Le istanze di fratellanza, uguaglianza e libertà francesi trovano la loro contraddizione oltreoceano, nelle colonie, laddove l’universalità di quei valori [...]

    7. (This review is also about the first two books in The Haitian Trilogy: All Souls' Rising and Master of the Crossroads.)I just returned from the best summer reading experience I've had in a very long time. I spent almost 2000 pages soaking up the imagined atmosphere of Saint Domingue (now Haiti) during the decade 1791-1801. In this superb historical fiction, M.S. Bell is an intrepid guide through the terrors and triumphs of the first successful slave revolution. His seemingly exhaustive research [...]

    8. This is the final novel completing Bell's fictional/historical trilogy of the complete Haitian Revolution. To read these book is to be transported back to the time of one of the most brutal eras of slavery. In Haiti were slaves wear generally treated even worse than in the United States, but had more of a culture to cling to than thier sisters and brothers in America. This book also cleverly takes us inside the Haitian culture of Voodoo used in the context of resistance and rebellion. The proble [...]

    9. In two previous books, Bell introduced Toussaint and charted the bloody events that gave birth to a nation. The Stone continues this saga. More than one critic compared the historical novel's dramatic battle scenes and impressive historical sweep to War and Peace. Though long, the sheer energy and humanity of the characters (both real and fictional), not to mention the novel's relevance to atrocities today, propel the narrative forward. Appendices, including a chronology of events, Creole glossa [...]

    10. the final book in bell's virtuoso trilogy on the haitian revolution i found reading the series a bit like reading the lord of the rings in terms of the sense of athletic accomplishment after finishing it -- one is tragic and true, the other triumphant and fantastic, but the weight of the accrued history weighs heavily in each. also, i had lunch with him at the stanford faculty club and he talked about his experiences researching it -- a fascinating guy (and paul farmer's college roommate).

    11. I really enjoyed this book about the history of Haiti and the wars that formed it. It's quite long and covers both fictional characters that illustrate what life was like as well as the tactics and actualities of the battles.At times because the names are foreign to me it was time to remember who was who. And I found some of the battle scenes tedious. But I am glad I read it and overall enjoyed the book.

    12. This is the third of the series, not as exciting as the first two, but it resolves the fates of the various characters. I loved getting to know the main characters in these books - especially the slave Rouau who leads a double existence - and watching them change and deepen over time. I felt like they were my close friends by the end of the trilogy, as did my cousin, who also loved the series.

    13. final in the Haitian Revolution trilogy. I did not get into this one as much. Seemed less cohesive somehow. Also, I think that the time lapse between each book's publish date made it difficult for my feeble brain to keep all of the characters and details straight.

    14. A Strong FinishI cannot recommend this series enough. Finishing these books it feels like I'm saying goodbye to people I know. Yes it doesn't have a happy ending because it wasn't a happy time but it stayed true to the time and the characters to the end.

    15. The third book of the trilogy. Once again, interesting if you know a lot about the Haitian revolution - otherwise, a jumble of characters. I do like his literary style.

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