The Lazy Project Manager: How to be Twice as Productive and Still Leave the Office Early

The Lazy Project Manager How to be Twice as Productive and Still Leave the Office Early In The lazy project manager Peter Taylor illustrates how we can achieve without expending time and energy Welcome to the home of productive laziness and a focused approach to project management Here

  • Title: The Lazy Project Manager: How to be Twice as Productive and Still Leave the Office Early
  • Author: Peter Taylor
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 353
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In The lazy project manager, Peter Taylor illustrates how we can achieve without expending time and energy Welcome to the home of productive laziness and a focused approach to project management Here, we are able to exercise our efforts where they really matter instead of rushing round involving ourselves in unimportant, non critical activities that otheIn The lazy project manager, Peter Taylor illustrates how we can achieve without expending time and energy Welcome to the home of productive laziness and a focused approach to project management Here, we are able to exercise our efforts where they really matter instead of rushing round involving ourselves in unimportant, non critical activities that others can better address, or indeed that may not need addressing at all It s all about working smarter and Peter Taylor gives his trade secrets away in a lively and entertaining way This is not a training manual You won t turn into a project manager by reading this book But Peter, acting as virtual coach will help you to identify and focus on the activities in your projects, do them well and enjoy the world of productive laziness.

    One thought on “The Lazy Project Manager: How to be Twice as Productive and Still Leave the Office Early”

    1. It's an easy read, sometimes stating the obvious, but with anecdotes and story telling.Personally, I would prefer something more hard hitting, than fun. Some of the advice is sound, others you might want to re-assess if it is suitable in your world.e.g. the book gives advice on 'dress to impress' (first impressions) as a project manager, and in some projects I have worked on, especially in Agile software development, there are organisations where if you dress down, you are more respected; but th [...]

    2. I picked this up on a lark when it was available as a free download for the Kindle. I'm glad it was free - I think I'd feel cheated if I'd had to pay for it.This is a very short book about how to be more effective as a project manager. It's also fairly entertaining, at least such books go - I have no qualms with the writing.It's the content that turned me off. Pretty much everything in the book boils down to "a lot of up-front effort planning will pay off later; delegate as much as possible; don [...]

    3. I'd like to give this book 2 1/2 stars. Overall, if you're a good and intelligent project manager, this book doesn't tell you anything you don't already know. If you're not, this book won't help. Some interesting stories. The dinosaur comparison is nice. Short, easy read.

    4. Don't let the title fool you-it's about how to be an effective team member and project manager. Good read. Good for buisness that need to be more effective.

    5. In this book, project management consultant Peter Taylor espouses his concept of "productive laziness". This essentially boils down to running projects effectively, in a manner where the project manager does not get over-burdened. Can't object to that!The book presents as its key insight that if you spend the time up-front to plan your project carefully, then it will be easier to execute. This is a basic notion that is understood by pretty much every project manager in the field; it's hardly new [...]

    6. This book tells you how to be lazy by focusing and working hard on the 20% that really matters in a project. It shows that as a project manager, you do not necessarily have all the knowledge and skills but you should instead leverage your team to get things done. The book is full of anecdotes and useful charts to help you visualise the content. It's an enjoying read and suitable for people who are looking to get things done efficiently and effectively.

    7. A tiny book of home spun, in-the-trenches wisdom from a project manager that's clearly experienced the trials and tribulations of many development cycles. For those familiar with routine issues faced by projects, Taylor's stories and advice will ring true in a concise, practical manner you'll want to pass around the office.

    8. Nice short book with some important reminders about project management. It is worth reading but you won't find anything particularly different or insightful.

    9. Very funny and useful book about managing projects and staying cool while laughing along the way. Learned a lot.

    10. Got this because it was free on kindle. Broad, basic content about planning ahead and delegating, filled out with mildly interesting anecdotes. Glad it was free.

    11. Of all the business books I’ve read, I would classify The Lazy Project Manager as mediocre-poor. While some of the content was insightful and useful, the spacing, corny jokes and repeated requests to buy multiple copies of the book made the reading somewhat cringe-worthy. I think this may have been a desperate attempt by the author or the publisher to make this book big enough to be a book because, in reality, it would probably be more useful if it was condensed into an internet article one st [...]

    12. Brief read that recaps all the rules of thumb that you know intuitively from your battle scarred years of leading successful and some rather unsuccessful projects. If you are a new project leader-- this book is a shortcut to gaining the lessons of the experienced professionals without the scar.In the opening chapter the author outlines what this book is not, it is not a book for learning to become a PMP or any other acronym soup for the project management discipline. In fact I would recommend th [...]

    13. Peter Taylor‘s hartekreet aan vakgenoten in projectmanagement: werk slimmer om tijd over te houden. Productive laziness noemt hij dat. Dus niet lui achterover leunen en niets doen, maar juist die dingen doen die je projectsucces echt kunnen ‘maken’. In The Lazy Project manager leer je waarom een project een gedegen voorbereiding behoeft om je opdrachtgever te leren kennen, plannen te kunnen smeden om je opdracht vorm te geven en de benodigde resultaten en activiteiten in kaart te hebben. A [...]

    14. The lazy project manager illustrates how anyone can apply the simple techniques of lazy project management in their own activities in order to work more effectively and consequently improve work–life balance. This ‘productive laziness’ approach builds on the Pareto principle that states that for many phenomena, 80 per cent of consequences stem from 20 per cent of the causes. To put it simply, only 20 per cent of the things people do during their working days really matter.”Inside this bo [...]

    15. O livro falha em trazer ao leitor alguma informação realmente útil. A maneira que o autor escreve é desinteressante, tornando a leitura tediosa em vários capítulos. O título com a palavra preguiçoso é simplesmente uma jogada de marketing para vender mais. Pela leitura do livro percebe-se a tentativa (fracassada) do autor em associar o conceito de preguiça ao de produtividade. A comparação desastrosa de um projeto com um dinossauro (em uma nova tentativa fracassada de deixar o livro m [...]

    16. This is a slim volume with an abundance of white space, able to be digested in one trip on the Tube (albeit a very long, delayed & interrupted one - thank you London Transport for your contribution to my education!)Despite the size, once it gets past the rather waffly start, it's an excellent book - full of good advice & hard-won experience, aimed at enabling the project manager to be "lazy" (for which, read "efficient and effective"). Not entirely convinced about the "inverse dinosaur" [...]

    17. What intrigued me: Clayton heard about this book in one of his training classes, and thought I would enjoy it. I laughed out loud at the title when I opened the package, and had to start reading it immediately.What I liked: I finished it in a few hours! I loved the dry humor, and I think there are some very good takeaways. I really want to print out the "Even quicker tips for the really lazy" and hang it at my desk!What I didn't like: When all the grey-scale-grids look the same none of them real [...]

    18. The Lazy project manager is a guidebook for project managers looking for a way to make the best use of valuable project time. The overarching theme is that a lot of effort should be put in up front, followed by a period of somewhat 'lazy' time in the middle when execution is occurring and then a big push at the end to deliver the final product.[return][return]The book is filled with helpful tips for success and the author utilizes humor and wit throughout to keep the reader engaged. Considering [...]

    19. Picked this book up after seeing a positive review, but was disappointed. There's simply not a lot of information or insight in the book. While easy to read with pleasant enough anecdotes, the 10 bullets provided in the "Even quicker tips for the really lazy" chapter (which take about 1 page to list out) really do cover everything the 150-page book is saying - and even then, the list itself is not very insightful.

    20. I just think it doesn't really say anything or perhaps this is not what I am looking for. For those who are burried-deep in the nitty gritty of managing a project, or simply too overwhelmed by it, the book may be useful. For me, I am definitely still in the search of a good project management book

    21. I found this to be an enjoyable and engaging read. It often stated the obvious but sometimes being reminded of the obvious is a good thing. There were definitely some tips in there that I hadn't come across before.

    22. Totally agree with all other 2-star reviews! Light reading stating the obvious, however could be helpful to review from time to time. My favorite part was on communication - the most important aspect of project management.

    23. No what I expected, it didnt taught me anything, I should mention that the story about the PM & the frog was fun, it reminds me a friend of mine. Actually I was looking for tools, templates, email auto-organizers, interactive TODOs apps, things that help you to optimize your time.

    24. As with most business titles, there's a lot of fluff to get it up to a length that doesn't look foolishly small when bound. Some good tips, but mostly good reminders. More like a good jumping off point for professional reevaluation.

    25. Practical advice, good reminders. I liked the first part of the book slightly more, feeling there wasn't enough essence to justify a full book. But I'll certainly store some of the author's guidelines for future reference.

    26. Short, succinct overview on how to manage people and projects. Works well as a refresher on the most important skills for project managers.

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