Dietro il vetro sottile. Memorie di un ebreo omosessuale nella berlino nazista

Dietro il vetro sottile Memorie di un ebreo omosessuale nella berlino nazista L omofobia del regime nazista forse meno nota del suo antisemitismo ma ha generato anch essa segregazioni deportazioni morti Nel Hitler mise al bando organizzazioni e pubblicazioni omosessuali

  • Title: Dietro il vetro sottile. Memorie di un ebreo omosessuale nella berlino nazista
  • Author: Gad Beck L. Boschetti
  • ISBN: 9788806197544
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Hardcover
  • L omofobia del regime nazista forse meno nota del suo antisemitismo, ma ha generato anch essa segregazioni, deportazioni, morti Nel 1933 Hitler mise al bando organizzazioni e pubblicazioni omosessuali, mentre Heinrich Himmler, il capo delle SS, predicava la completa eliminazione degli omosessuali In quegli anni terribili Gad Beck, figlio di un ebreo austriaco e di unaL omofobia del regime nazista forse meno nota del suo antisemitismo, ma ha generato anch essa segregazioni, deportazioni, morti Nel 1933 Hitler mise al bando organizzazioni e pubblicazioni omosessuali, mentre Heinrich Himmler, il capo delle SS, predicava la completa eliminazione degli omosessuali In quegli anni terribili Gad Beck, figlio di un ebreo austriaco e di una luterana tedesca, conduceva la sua infanzia e adolescenza a Berlino, scoprendosi in maniera naturale, e senza sensi di colpa, attratto dagli uomini Nel cuore di una Germania che si avvia verso la persecuzione razziale pi orribile, Gad vive il progressivo restringimento del suo spazio di vita, di lavoro e di espressione, ma non si arrende alle difficolt e non rinuncia a gustare fino in fondo il sapore della giovinezza, dell amicizia, dell a Impegnato nei movimenti sionisti, entra a far parte di un gruppo clandestino che agisce a sostegno degli ebrei, fino a che non viene tradito da una spia della Gestapo, arrestato, torturato Sar l arrivo delle truppe sovietiche a salvarlo da morte certa In questo libro Gad Beck racconta con una voce freschissima e mai patetica l avventura di un ragazzo ingenuo ma arguto, furbo ma profondamente buono, che riusc a non farsi contaminare dalla paura e dall orrore del totalitarismo nazista.

    One thought on “Dietro il vetro sottile. Memorie di un ebreo omosessuale nella berlino nazista”

    1. Several years ago I saw a documentary entitled "Paragraph 175," which looked at the persecution of gays and lesbians in Nazi Germany. A few days ago, I got a sudden inexplicable urge to watch the documentary again. It took me a few days to find a copy online that wasn't dubbed into Italian, but eventually I did.After watching it, I started googling the different people interviewed. Most of them died nearly a decade ago, but when I looked up one person -- Gad Beck -- I noticed 2 things:1. We shar [...]

    2. I had to read this book for a class on the Holocaust. We were given an extensive list to choose from and I picked this one because we have been told how if the Nazis had actually exterminated the Jews, gays would have been next. I was expecting something along the lines of other Holocaust books I have read, namely a depressing, heart-wrenching tale of the depravity of the human race. Instead, I was largely entertained. God forbid, I even laughed at parts. This CANT be a Holocaust memoir, can it? [...]

    3. Any review of a book about the lives of jewish people living in Germany during WWII will not do justice to the suffering and persecution that they were subject to.From my perspective this was an interesting read, though not as emotional as I had expected it to be.Considering that this is an autobiography of a gay jewish man living in Berlin during WWII I thought it would come across as a lot more harrowing than it did - this isn't to dismiss anything that happened to him as it is all pretty stre [...]

    4. I didn't expect there to be so much sex in a story about a Jewish boy living in Nazi Germany. I suppose something had to be done to lighten the mood, but Gad Beck seems to have seduced or been seduced by every man and boy in Berlin. Lucky him. He also found himself being, not only gay and Jewish under the thumb of Hitler's regime, but also part of the very resistance that saved a number of lives and even entire families on the better days. Not among those saved was Manfred Lewin, Beck's love, wh [...]

    5. There's something about this memoir which is completely captivating. First of all, the author only died a few months ago, which is a kind of miracle: a gay, Jewish, Berliner who worked in the resistance, survived the war living in Berlin. All in all this perspective on life in Berlin during the war offers a glimpse of horror confronted with a kind of perverse optimism. For many, the optimism achieved nothing. For others, they lived to tell the tale.

    6. On one hand, a fascinating life and fascinating story of survival. It's very interesting to see how the status of "mischlings" worked in Nazi Germany. On the other hand, some of the sexual encounters described in the book verge very far into pedophilia and incest, without any characterizations of them as such, and that is quite frankly uncomfortable at the least.

    7. An amazing read with a lot of heart, but you have to keep in mind that it is very short - about 170 pages. There were times when I wish more information could have been given, or more details in the setting as it is so fascinating and it is a unique addition to Holocaust literature.

    8. I felt a bit disappointed with this book. Gad Beck was an incredible human being who saved so many lives and really was a backbone of gay Jewish survival during the holocaust. His life was fascinating; accidentally becoming a revolutionary at a young age all while trying to find himself through many jobs, lovers, friends, and tragedies. His account of his life has a lot of value and shows the unique challenges faced by gay Jewish people during the war. Mamsi was a very endearing character as wel [...]

    9. Gad Beck is a remarkable man who led an extraordinary life. His memoirs about life as a young, Jewish, gay man in Nazi Germany may not have the literary qualities that the most famous testimonies written by Jews who survived this harrowing era possess, but they are so vivid, filled with such an intense love of life, and so fascinating in what they reveal about daily life in Berlin under a brutal regime, that it hardly matters. An Underground Life is as gripping as it is moving, and remains, till [...]

    10. Fascinating--and horrifying-- details of surviving in Berlin during WWII as a gay Jewish man. Well written in concise prose.

    11. He was half Jewish, gay, and a teenaged Zionist resistance fighter, living in Nazi Berlin- by all accounts, Gad Beck should of never survived World War II. But he did, and his memior is one of the most moving portraits of World War II life I have ever read. The walls and lives of Berlin collapse around him, but Gad Beck writes about being surrounded by friends, family, and lovers that all manage to stand so tall. A must read.

    12. A great biographical account of a gay jew (of mixed parentage to be exact) in Berlin who survived the war. It's hard to imagine living as half jew / gay at the headquaters of the Nazi regime - kind of like living as a halfling on mount doom in lord of the things and surviving!A great read though from a historical point of view. Even though he was in the middle of such a terrible place/time he still managed to pull!

    13. Fantastically witty, insightful, heartbreaking and hopeful memoir of a young gay man, his family and friends doing all they can to survive war torn Berlin. Despite the obviously difficult subject, Beck's life account left me with mixed emotions but mostly joy - joy at how he not only survived but how he lived his life. A lesson for us all.

    14. Amazing story. A book that I just couldn't put down, all the more amazing because it's true.Although the story of a gay Jew living in Berlin under the Nazi should be horrific, Beck has such a way with words that it's simply engrossing.

    15. It's hard to imagine facing arrest and incarceration in a concentration camp for being gay - but this is the world Gad Beck describes. It's even harder to imagine the treatment the author received after the war ended. Not cheerful, but worth reading.

    16. Extraordinary story, extraordinary life."God doesn't punish for a life of love." - Gad Beck, (30 June 1923 - 24 June 2012)

    17. A short but poignant insight in life for gays in Berlin under the Nazis. I wish it was more in depth at places

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